Alex Ionescu: Advancing the State of UEFi Bootkids, slides online

http://www.alex-ionescu.com/publications/

VisualUEFI udpated

https://github.com/ionescu007/VisualUefi

http://www.windows-internals.com/pages/training-services/windows-uefi-development/

Alex on Intel segmentation

[…]What I discovered completely changed my understanding of 64-bit Long Mode semantics and challenged many assumptions I was making – pinging a few other experts, it seems they were as equally surprised as I was (even Mateusz”j00ru” Jurczyk wasn’t aware!). Throughout this blog post, you’ll see how x64 processors, even when operating in 64-bit long mode[…]

http://www.alex-ionescu.com/?p=340

See-also:
http://j00ru.vexillium.org/?p=290

 

 

SimpleSvm: hypervisor for AMD Windows systems

SimpleSvm is a minimalistic educational hypervisor for Windows on AMD processors. It aims to provide small and explanational code to use Secure Virtual Machine (SVM), the AMD version of Intel VT-x, with Nested Page Tables (NPT) from a windows driver. SimpleSvm is inspired by SimpleVisor, an Intel x64/EM64T VT-x specific hypervisor for Windows, written by Alex Ionescu.

https://github.com/tandasat/SimpleSvm

Windows Internals new edition out

http://www.alex-ionescu.com/?p=335

https://blogs.msdn.microsoft.com/microsoft_press/2017/05/09/new-book-windows-internals-seventh-edition-part-1/

https://www.microsoftpressstore.com/store/windows-internals-part-1-system-architecture-processes-9780735684188

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Wow, this book has gone a long way from “Inside Windows NT” by Helen Custer, the original author:

http://dl.acm.org/citation.cfm?id=138407

https://archive.org/details/insidewindowsnt00solo

Windbg updated

Windbg, Microsoft’s Windows system debugger, has been released with new features, one of which is ability to write debugger scripts in JavaScript.

(WordPress renders the MSDN blog URL strangely, if you can’t click on that, click on the URL in Alex’s twtter.)

 

https://blogs.msdn.microsoft.com/windbg/2016/10/27/new-insider-sdk-and-javascript-extensibility/

SimpleVisor is now also UEFIsor!

Wow, he’s fast:

https://firmwaresecurity.com/2016/08/31/alex-working-on-uefisor-simplevisor-for-uefi/

Not a new UEFIor project, like I was for some reason expecting, but the same project as the existing SimpleVisor.

https://github.com/ionescu007/SimpleVisor

http://ionescu007.github.io/SimpleVisor/

https://github.com/ionescu007/SimpleVisor/commit/98af3a870a27d66e820379056ea09153ef823332

 

 

Alex’s SimpleVisor now supports EPT and VPID

Re: Alex’s Intel x64 Windows-based hypervisor:

https://firmwaresecurity.com/2016/03/17/simplevisor-new-hypervisor-for-intel-x64-windows/

it now supports more features:

https://github.com/ionescu007/SimpleVisor/commit/fd1d7e043a24fd4afd72dc5f040d04475f9e5acd

https://github.com/ionescu007/SimpleVisor

I hope he targets UefiVisor next. I am guessing that UEFI will get more interesting as an OS — and not just a bootloader — once someone ports a VM to a UEFI app.

SimpleVisor: new hypervisor for Intel x64 Windows

Alex Ionescu has released a new hypervisor for Windows:

SimpleVisor is a simple, Intel x64 Windows-specific hypervisor with two specific goals: using the least amount of assembly code (10 lines), and having the smallest amount of VMX-related code to support dynamic hyperjacking and unhyperjacking (that is, virtualizing the host state from within the host).

http://ionescu007.github.io/SimpleVisor/

Windows UEFI development course

WinInsider — probably via Alex Ionescu — has a UEFI development course available.  Alex is the author of VisualUEFI, which hides the non-Visual Studio’isms of EDK-II development. Alex, along with others at Wininternals, is also one of the current authors of the “Windows Internals”  book from Microsoft Press, now a 2-volume 6th edition set, originally called “Inside Windows NT”, written by Helen Custer.

Windows UEFI Development (3 Days or 5 Days)

In this course, one can expect to learn the internals of the Unified Extensible Firmware Interface inside and out, from the high-level concepts and overview of its functionality, down to the low-level development of actual UEFI applications, drivers, and services. The seminar will go over the history of UEFI’s development, from its original “Intel Boot Initiative” days to today’s SecureBoot facilities (and controversies), discuss the core UEFI data structures that form the basis of the environment, describe the different internal boot phases of the UEFI Runtime, and go in detail over the main UEFI protocols and their semantics. The course will also cover how UEFI leverages several Microsoft technologies, such as Authenticode and the Portable Executable (PE) format. Finishing off the lecture section will be a deep dive on how Windows 8 and later take advantage of UEFI to support booting off GPT disks, implementing SecureBoot, and speeding up the boot experience. Windows user-mode and kernel-mode APIs that interact with UEFI, as well as internal kernel data structures and capabilities in the UEFI HAL will also be shown off. Alongside the lecture period, attendees will get their hands dirty with bare-to-the-metal UEFI development using Visual Studio, as well as learning how to setup the UEFI SDK (EDK) to work alongside Microsoft’s development tools. Participants will get the chance to build their own UEFI applications, drivers, and runtime services, as well as learn how to debug and test their work in the OVMF environment alongside QEMU, without requiring actual UEFI hardware. The course will also show how to develop and build SecureBoot-compatible binaries. Finally, attendees will discover the Windows-specific Boot Application Runtime Environment, how to build compatible applications, and how to leverage the environment from both a UEFI and PCAT perspective. Attendees will then write both offensive and defensive UEFI code that hooks and/or protects the Windows Boot Loader.

UEFI Course Outline:
* Introduction to UEFI
* UEFI Architecture
* UEFI Protocols & Services
* Windows and UEFI
* Windows Boot Application Environment
* Windows Boot Loader Internals
* EDK and Visual Studio Development
* Windows & UEFI Interfacing

Topics:
* UEFI Protocols: UEFI Device Handles, UEFI Text and Graphics, UEFI Local and Remote I/O, UEFI USB & PCI, UEFI File System, Custom Protocols
* UEFI Services: UEFI Boot Services & Runtime Services, UEFI System Table, ACPI & UEFI, Custom Services
* UEFI Architecture: Measured Boot & Secure Boot, UEFI Stages & Layers (SEC, PEI, DXE), GPT Partitioning, Types of UEFI Binaries
* Windows & UEFI: Calling UEFI Services, Accessing UEFI Variables, Windows Boot Library and UEFI, BCD and UEFI, HAL and UEFI
* Windows Boot Environment: PCAT and UEFI Portability, Core Data Structures, Entrypoint and Callbacks,  Building a Windows Boot Application
* Windows Boot Loader: Boot Stages, Boot Loader Functionality, Security Services (BitLocker and more), Boot Structures, Handoff to Kernel
* UEFI Development: Obtaining and Installing the EDK, Setting up Visual Studio with the EDK, EDK Hello World, Interfacing with EDK Libraries, Obtaining and Installing OVMF
* Offensive UEFI: Hooking UEFI Services and Protocols, Windows Boot Environment Hooks, Persistence with UEFI
* Defensive UEFI: Checking for Boot Loader Integrity, Detecting UEFI Hooks and Bootkits

http://www.windows-internals.com/?page_id=1673

http://www.alex-ionescu.com/

WPBT attacks from the past: Alex at SyScan12

The recent Lenovo LSE blunder made most of the world aware of Windows WBPT ACPI table and how the firmware injects an executable into the OS, a feature of Windows that all OEMs are likely using. While the media is wondering about WBPT and why it’s not prominently displayed on many web sites, Xeno of LegbaCore pointed out that Alex Ionescu gave a talk at SyScan 2012 on this specific topic:

ACPI 5.0 Rootkit Attacks Againts Windows 8
Alex Ionescu
This talk will disclose certain new features of the ACPI 5.0 Specification which is now public and was primarily designed to support ACPI on ARM Embedded SoCs for the upcoming release of Windows 8. Some of these new features have important security considerations which have not been traditionally monitored by security products and/or users, specifically in the areas of covert code execution at Ring 0 privileges.

https://www.syscan.org/index.php/download/get/a722b1acb9396d82323da3a78235fdc0/SyScan12Slides.zip
https://www.syscan.org/index.php/archive/view/year/2012/city/sg/pg/program
https://www.syscan.org/index.php/archive/view/year/2012/city/sg/pg/speakers#004
https://www.syscan.org/index.php/download/previous
http://www.alex-ionescu.com/

Thanks for reminding us, Xeno!

new tool: Visual UEFI for Windows

Alex Ionescu just created a new project to help with Visual Studio / EDK-II integration.

https://github.com/ionescu007/VisualUefi

Excerpting from it’s readme, VisualUEFI is 3 things:

1) a Solution and set of Visual Studio 2015 Project Files to allow building the official EDK-II without the use of inf files, Python and 50 other build tools, a custom dependency tracker and build system, and twenty other custom pieces of code. The EDK-II is present as a submodule, directly from the official TianoCore Tree, and no changes are done to it.
2) a Solution and couple of Visual Studio 2015 Project Files to show two UEFI sample components: A UEFI Application, and a UEFI Boot Driver. The code is 100% EDK-II compatible, but built with VisualUEFI instead.
3) a working copy of QEMU64 2.3 for Windows, with a fairly recent UEFI 2.5 OVMF Secure Boot ROM. These will updated on an ongoing basis as needed. This is integrated with the Visual Studio 2015 Sample Solution so that pressing F5 will spin up the instance for testing.

You should be able to open the EDK-II.SLN file and build without any issues in Visual Studio 2015. WDK or other 3rd party installations are not needed. Once the EDK-II libraries are built, you should be able to open the SAMPLES.SLN file and build the two samples, which will create UefiApplication.efi and UefiDriver.efi.

You can press F5 (Run/Debug) from within the Sample Solution, which should spin up the QEMU instance with 512MB of ram, and your release directory as a virtual file system accessible through “fs0:”. You can then try loading the driver with “Load fs0:\UefiDriver.efi”. You can verify its presence by using the Drivers or DevTree commands.

Visual UEFI looks like a nice improvement to Microsoft’s Visual Studio IDE. Thanks, Alex!

(This is the kind of thing I kept expecting the UEFI Forum to release, as an Eclipse plugin, like Yocto and some related projects have done.)