Uncategorized

CHIPSEC gets efi_compressor

 

https://github.com/chipsec/chipsec/pull/152

https://github.com/chipsec/chipsec

(I haven’t looked at this patch yet, but I hope it’s a Python native version, since CHIPSEC used Linux/Windows/UEFI native versions of external compress/decompress tools, and it would be nice to have a pure Python version, compression and decompression. If you want to better trust CHIPSEC,in addition to reviewing it’s source code, you also have to deal with the compress/decompress blobs and CPython for UEFI blobs that it ships, and have to build your own versions. I think I noticed a few Microsoft Windows Win32 .exe files embedded inside that UEFI CPython release, which should not be there.)

 

Standard
Uncategorized

CHIPSEC talk at OPCDE 2017

Exploring Your System Deeper
 Oleksandr Bazhaniuk – Intel – United States

You wanted to explore deep corners of your system but didn???t know how? System boot firmware, ROMs on expansion cards, I/O devices and their firmware, microprocessors, embedded controllers, memory devices, low-level hardware interfaces, virtualization and hypervisors. You could discover if any of these have known vulnerabilities, configured insecurely or even discover new vulnerabilities and develop proof-of-concept exploits to test these vulnerabilities. Ultimately, you can verify security state of platform components of your system and how effective are the platform security defenses: hardware or virtualization based TEE, secure or trusted boot, firmware anti-tampering mechanisms, hypervisor based isolation… Or maybe you just want to explore hardware and firmware components your system has. CHIPSEC framework can help you with all of that. Since releasing it three years ago at CanSecWest 2014 significant improvements have been made in the framework – from making it easy to install and use to adding lots of new security capabilities. We’ll go over certain representative examples of what you can do with it such as finding vulnerabilities in SMM firmware, analyzing UEFI firmware vulnerabilities, testing hardware security mechanisms of the hypervisors, finding backdoors in UEFI images and more.

 

http://www.opcde.com/speakers.html

Standard
Uncategorized

CHIPSEC gets Arch packaging

https://aur.archlinux.org/packages/chipsec-dkms-git/

https://aur.archlinux.org/packages/chipsec-git/

Standard
Uncategorized

CHIPSEC v1.2.5 published!

This version has Python.org-based packaging, which I think was originally introduced by the GRR fork of CHIPSEC. This means you can do “pip install chipsec” on some systems. It will require a compiler toolchain to build and install the kernel driver, which is a bit more than you’d expect from a normal pip Python package install… 🙂

Unclear of all the other changes yet:

https://github.com/chipsec/chipsec/commits/master

Standard
Uncategorized

CHIPSEC ported to ARM??

screenshot: https://pbs.twimg.com/media/CubkpMsVIAAIrQT.jpg:large

Intel CHIPSEC is — or at least was —  Intel-specific. Actually it may be called McAfee CHIPSEC now? Anyway, it did not work on ARM. Via Linaro, ARM Ltd. was in the process of porting LUV (Linux UEFI Validation) distro to AArch64, and LUV includes CHIPSEC, so that was on the list, but AFAIK Linaro had not yet started to port CHIPSEC to ARM yet.

So the above screenshot is news to me, and very exciting. I hope we get more news about this soon!! AND a source check-in (currently nothing in repo)… 🙂

 

 

Standard