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slides from yesterday’s BSides Seattle presentation (and seeking archive of lost Intel ATR blog on Hacking Team)

Yesterday I gave a presentation at Bsides Seattle on defending firmware. This version of the presentation attemped to address DFIR audience, not just SysAdmin/Site Reliablity Engineer audience.

I got some interesting feedback on IR after this presentation, we’ll do a blog on this in the next few days. As well as a few updates to existing IR standards to showcase where firmware is lacking.

Below is copy of slides:

There are 4 sections, Threats, Tech, Tools, and Guidance. The Tech section is probably weakest to read without having an audio. This talk was result of trying to jam a 4-hour training session into a 1-hour talk, the Tech section lost the most from this compression.

bsidesseattle2018.fisher.defending-firmware

Bsides didn’t record audio/video of their event.

I updated the slides from yesterday, the “DIY Homework” section focused on following along with the analysis in the old Intel ATR blog post on the Wikileaked Hacking Team UEFI malware blob. However, that blog URL is no longer around.

If you know of any online archives of these URLs, please leave a Comment on this blog post, thanks!
http://www.intelsecurity.com/advanced-threat-research/blog.html
http://www.intelsecurity.com/advanced-threat-research/ht_uefi_rootkit.html_7142015.html

This is the best-fit replacement for missing above URL, and it includes some new content (eg, blacklist command) that original blog did not. Save a copy of the blog post, I don’t expect it to be archived:

https://securingtomorrow.mcafee.com/business/chipsec-support-vault-7-disclosure-scanning/

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chipsec/modules/common/cpu/spectre_v2.py

Re: https://firmwaresecurity.com/2018/01/17/yuriy-working-on-new-hipsec-spectre-test/

https://github.com/chipsec/chipsec/pull/330

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Yuriy working on new CHIPSEC Spectre test

Nice to see some recent CHIPSEC activity, given all the recent related CVEs…
…But this is not from the CHIPSEC team, it is from ex-CHIPSEC team member Yuriy of Eclypsium.

Added new module checking for Spectre variant 2
The module checks if system is affected by Speculative Execution Side Channel vulnerabilities. Specifically, the module verifies that the system supports hardware mitigations for Branch Target Injection a.k.a. Spectre Variant 2 (CVE-2017-5715)

See source comments for more info.

https://github.com/c7zero/chipsec/commit/b11bce8a0ed19cbe1d6319ef9928a297b9308840

 

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Resolvit seeks CHIPSEC-savvy Pentester

It is still rare enough to see “CHIPSEC” in a job posting, that I still point them out.

Given job posting is a pentest role, this is also a ‘leading indicator’ that pentesters are starting to attack your firmware. 🙂

Penetration Tester – Product
Join Resolvit as a Penetration Tester and be part of a creative, forward-thinking team. Our success at deploying skilled, highly knowledgeable experts has landed us on the Inc. 5000 list of America’s fastest-growing companies four times – and we’re just getting started. As the Penetration Tester, you will configure security test targets such as servers, storage, and networking environments; perform product security assessments; create assessment reports; and work with global product teams to review assessment results.[…]
Experience with multiple of these security assessment tools: AppAudit, Arachni, Burp Suite Pro, CHIPSEC, nmap, Nessus, Protecode SC, and Metasploit
[…]

http://careers.resolvit.com/Careers/tabid/55/jobid/21807/Penetration-Tester–Product-Morrisville-North-Carolina.aspx

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Brian: Using CHIPSEC Whitelists to Improve Firmware Security

[Strange, I was doing the previous blog post on Brian, and during that time, he did a new blog post…]

Brian Richardson of Intel has a new blog post on using CHIPSEC whitelist command to help with UEFI security:

Using Whitelists to Improve Firmware Security

Firmware has become more popular in the world of computer security research. Attacks operating at the firmware level can be difficult to discover, and have the potential to persist even in bare-metal recovery scenarios. This type of hack has been well documented by investigations of the HackingTeam and Vault7 exploits. Fortunately, there are methods for detecting and defending against such attacks. Firmware-based attacks typically attempt to add or modify system firmware modules stored in NVRAM. Tools provided by the open source CHIPSEC project can be used to generate and verify hashes of these modules, so users can detect unauthorized changes.[…]

https://software.intel.com/en-us/blogs/2017/12/05/using-whitelists-to-improve-firmware-security
https://github.com/chipsec/chipsec

CHIPSEC in Ubuntu Linux

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