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BIOS and the IBM PC Technical Reference

Nice, another online source to this classic document. There are a few other sources online, if you search. If you’ve never read this book, it is a great read, with the source to the PC BIOS listed, a great way to learn assembly language.

 

http://classiccomputers.info/down/IBM/IBM_PC_5150/IBM_5150_Technical_Reference_6025005_AUG81.pdf

 

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IBM: UEFI fixes for Spectre variants 4 and 3a (CVE-2018-3639 CVE-2018-3640)

https://www.ibm.com/blogs/psirt/ibm-security-bulletin-ibm-has-released-unified-extensible-firmware-interface-uefi-fixes-in-response-to-spectre-variants-4-and-3a-cve-2018-3639-cve-2018-3640/

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IBM providing their OpenBMC code to Linux Foundation

[…]IBM is providing their OpenBMC code base to The Linux Foundation, and this project will be supported by several organizations, including Facebook, Google, Intel, and Microsoft. The community is looking to expand and invites contributors from across the industry to come together in defining and creating the OpenBMC stack.[…]The Linux Foundation is pleased to welcome OpenBMC to our family of open source projects and to work with the community to support its growth.[…]

https://www.linuxfoundation.org/blog/openbmc-project-community-comes-together-at-the-linux-foundation-to-define-open-source-implementation-of-bmc-firmware-stack/

https://www.openbmc.org/

https://github.com/openbmc/openbmc

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OpenPOWER firmware development

Stewart Smith of IBM has a new blog post that gives an introduction to OpenPOWER firmware dev.

A (simplified) view of OpenPOWER Firmware Development
I’ve been working on trying to better document the whole flow of code that goes into a build of firmware for an OpenPOWER machine. This is partially to help those not familiar with it get a better grasp of the sheer scale of what goes into that 32/64MB of flash. I also wanted to convey the components that we heavily re-used from other Open Source projects, what parts are still “IBM internal” (as they relate to the open source workflow) and which bits are primarily contributed to by IBMers (at least at this point in time).[…]

https://www.flamingspork.com/blog/2017/12/11/a-simplified-view-of-openpower-firmware-development/

 

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OpenPOWER firmware updates using ZMODEM

Stewart Smith of IBM has a new blog post about adding ZMODEM support to OpenPOWER firmware.

From checkin: This enables the use of rz/sz to send/receive files using ZMODEM. This enables error detection and correction when using the console to transfer files to/from the host.

From blog:

ZMODEM saves the day! Or, why my firmware for a machine with a CPU from 2017 contains a serial file transfer protocol from the 1980s

Recently, I added the package lrzsz to op-build in this commit. This package provides the rz and sz commands – for receive zmodem and send zmodem respectively. For those who don’t know, op-build builds a firmware image for OpenPOWER machines, and adding this package adds the commands to the petitboot shell (the busybox environment you get when you “exit to shell” from the boot menu).[…]

https://www.flamingspork.com/blog/2017/10/20/zmodem-saves-the-day-or-why-my-firmware-for-a-machine-with-a-cpu-from-2017-contains-a-serial-file-transfer-protocol-from-the-1980s/
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/ZMODEM

 

What’s next, a UEFI runtime service for Kermit, using CKermit? UEFI NNTP Boot, using signed images on alt.binaries.firmware.*? 🙂

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IBM OpenPower secure and trusted boot, Part 2

OpenPOWER secure and trusted boot, Part 2
Protecting system firmware with OpenPOWER secure boot
Making your system safe against boot code cyberattacks
Dave Heller and Nageswara Sastry
Published on June 05, 2017

This content is part 2 of 2 in the series: OpenPOWER secure and trusted boot. IBM® OpenPOWER servers offer two essential security features, trusted boot and secure boot, to help ensure the integrity of your server and safeguard against a boot code cyberattack. Trusted boot works by creating secure recordings, or measurements, of executable code as the system boots. Using a process known as remote attestation, you can retrieve these measurements securely and use them to verify the integrity of your firmware or target operating system (OS). Secure boot helps ensure the integrity of your OS and firmware as well. But rather than taking measurements for later examination, secure boot performs the validation in place, during boot, and will halt the boot process if the validation fails. These two features are complementary and work together to provide comprehensive protection of platform boot code. This article explores the secure boot method, with particular focus on protection of system firmware.[…]

https://www.ibm.com/developerworks/library/l-protect-system-firmware-openpower/

Part 1 is from Feburary:

https://www.ibm.com/developerworks/linux/library/l-trusted-boot-openPOWER-trs/index.html?ca=drs-

 

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