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OpenPOWER firmware updates using ZMODEM

Stewart Smith of IBM has a new blog post about adding ZMODEM support to OpenPOWER firmware.

From checkin: This enables the use of rz/sz to send/receive files using ZMODEM. This enables error detection and correction when using the console to transfer files to/from the host.

From blog:

ZMODEM saves the day! Or, why my firmware for a machine with a CPU from 2017 contains a serial file transfer protocol from the 1980s

Recently, I added the package lrzsz to op-build in this commit. This package provides the rz and sz commands – for receive zmodem and send zmodem respectively. For those who don’t know, op-build builds a firmware image for OpenPOWER machines, and adding this package adds the commands to the petitboot shell (the busybox environment you get when you “exit to shell” from the boot menu).[…]

https://www.flamingspork.com/blog/2017/10/20/zmodem-saves-the-day-or-why-my-firmware-for-a-machine-with-a-cpu-from-2017-contains-a-serial-file-transfer-protocol-from-the-1980s/
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/ZMODEM

 

What’s next, a UEFI runtime service for Kermit, using CKermit? UEFI NNTP Boot, using signed images on alt.binaries.firmware.*? 🙂

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IBM OpenPower secure and trusted boot, Part 2

OpenPOWER secure and trusted boot, Part 2
Protecting system firmware with OpenPOWER secure boot
Making your system safe against boot code cyberattacks
Dave Heller and Nageswara Sastry
Published on June 05, 2017

This content is part 2 of 2 in the series: OpenPOWER secure and trusted boot. IBM® OpenPOWER servers offer two essential security features, trusted boot and secure boot, to help ensure the integrity of your server and safeguard against a boot code cyberattack. Trusted boot works by creating secure recordings, or measurements, of executable code as the system boots. Using a process known as remote attestation, you can retrieve these measurements securely and use them to verify the integrity of your firmware or target operating system (OS). Secure boot helps ensure the integrity of your OS and firmware as well. But rather than taking measurements for later examination, secure boot performs the validation in place, during boot, and will halt the boot process if the validation fails. These two features are complementary and work together to provide comprehensive protection of platform boot code. This article explores the secure boot method, with particular focus on protection of system firmware.[…]

https://www.ibm.com/developerworks/library/l-protect-system-firmware-openpower/

Part 1 is from Feburary:

https://www.ibm.com/developerworks/linux/library/l-trusted-boot-openPOWER-trs/index.html?ca=drs-

 

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IBM Monacle and PowerVM firmware updates

[…]Under the Hood of Power Firmware Maintenance

The Service Processor of the server is running an embedded operating system with complex power firmware applications running on it; one of which is an application responsible for handling code updates. […]

https://www.ibm.com/developerworks/community/wikis/home?lang=en_us#!/wiki/Power%20Systems/page/Monocle%20Patch%20Management

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IBM updates Linux IMA to improve boot security

Thiago Jung Bauermann of IBM has submitted a 6-part patch to the Linux-IMA-devel/Linux-Kernel lists, with some improvements to Linux IMA for OpenPOWER secure/trusted boot. Including comments from parts 1 and 6 of the patch, see the full patch for full details.

Appended signatures support for IMA appraisal

On the OpenPOWER platform, secure boot and trusted boot are being implemented using IMA for taking measurements and verifying signatures. Since the kernel image on Power servers is an ELF binary, kernels are signed using the scripts/sign-file tool and thus use the same signature format as signed kernel modules. This patch series adds support in IMA for verifying those signatures. It adds flexibility to OpenPOWER secure boot, because it can boot kernels with the signature appended to them as well as kernels where the signature is stored in the IMA extended attribute. The first four patches are cleanups and improvements that can be taken independently from the others (and from each other as well). The last two are the ones actually focused on this feature. […] This patch introduces the appended_imasig keyword to the IMA policy syntax to specify that a given hook should expect the file to have the IMA signature appended to it. Here is how it can be used in a rule:

appraise func=KEXEC_KERNEL_CHECK appraise_type=appended_imasig
appraise func=KEXEC_KERNEL_CHECK appraise_type=appended_imasig|imasig

In the second form, IMA will accept either an appended signature or a signature stored in the extended attribute. In that case, it will first check whether there is an appended signature, and if not it will read it from the extended attribute. The format of the appended signature is the same used for signed kernel modules. This means that the file can be signed with the scripts/sign-file tool, with a command line such as this:

$ sign-file sha256 privkey_ima.pem x509_ima.der vmlinux

This code only works for files that are hashed from a memory buffer, not for files that are read from disk at the time of hash calculation. In other words, only hooks that use kernel_read_file can support appended signatures. The change in CONFIG_INTEGRITY_SIGNATURE to select CONFIG_KEYS instead of depending on it is to avoid a dependency recursion in CONFIG_IMA_APPRAISE_APPENDED_SIG, because CONFIG_MODULE_SIG_FORMAT selects CONFIG_KEYS and Kconfig complains that CONFIG_INTEGRITY_SIGNATURE depends on it.

https://lists.sourceforge.net/lists/listinfo/linux-ima-devel

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IBM on attacking Android Custom Boot Modes

IBM’s SecurityIntelligence has a story on attacking Android’s Custom Boot Modes.

Android Vulnerabilities: Attacking Nexus 6 and 6P Custom Boot Modes
By Roee Hay
Co-authored by Michael Goberman.

In recent months, the X-Force Application Security Research Team has discovered several previously undisclosed Android vulnerabilities. The November 2016 and January 2017 Android Security Bulletins included patches to one high-severity vulnerability, CVE-2016-8467, in Nexus 6 and 6P. Our new paper, “Attacking Nexus 6 & 6P Custom Bootmodes,” discusses this vulnerability as well as CVE-2016-6678.[…]

https://securityintelligence.com/android-vulnerabilities-attacking-nexus-6-and-6p-custom-boot-modes/

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Talos FlexVer technology -vs- Evil Maids

Talos has a new post on their use of FPGAs on their OpenPower-based workstation.

https://www.crowdsupply.com/raptor-computing-systems/talos-secure-workstation/updates/talos-fpga-functions-and-responsibilities-part-2

https://firmwaresecurity.com/2016/09/02/talos-secure-workstation-coreboot-power8/

 

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