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TPM microconf at 2017 Linux Plumbers Conference

Matthew Garrett has announced a TPM microconference at the upcoming Linux Plumbers Conference:

I’m pleased to say that after the success last year, there will be another TPM microconference at this year’s Linux Plumbers Conference. The current schedule has this taking place on Wednesday the 13th of September, so just under 4 weeks from now. We have a list of proposals for discussion at http://wiki.linuxplumbersconf.org/2017:tpms but please feel free to add more! I intend to finalise the schedule by the end of next week, so please do so as soon as you can. For those of you who weren’t there, the Linux Plumbers conference is an event dedicated to bringing together people working on various infrastructural components (the plumbing) of Linux. Microconferences are 3 hour long events dedicated to a specific topic, with the focus on identifying problems and having enough people in the room to start figuring out what the solutions should be – the format is typically some short presentations coupled with discussion.

From James Bottomley’s comments on the LPC entry on this microconf:

Following on from the TPM Microconference last year, we’re pleased to announce there will be a follow on at Plumbers in Los Angeles this year. The agenda for this year will focus on a renewed attempt to unify the 2.0 TSS; cryptosystem integration to make TPMs just work for the average user; the current state of measured boot and where we’re going; using TXT with TPM in Linux and using TPM from containers.

http://wiki.linuxplumbersconf.org/2017:tpms

http://www.linuxplumbersconf.org/2017/trusted-platform-module-microconference-accepted-into-the-linux-plumbers-conference/

Full text of Matthew’s email:
https://lists.sourceforge.net/lists/listinfo/linux-ima-devel

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American coreboot conference

https://www.coreboot.org/Denver2017

 

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Workshop on Security for Embedded and Mobile Systems

Secure and Efficient RNS software implementation for Elliptic Curve Cryptography
Practical Power Analysis on KCipher-2 Software on Low-End Microcontrollers
Use of simulators for side-channel analysis
Secure positioning: From GPS to IoT
Permutation-based cryptography for embedded and mobile systems
The Curious Case of the Curious Case: Detecting touchscreen events using a smartphone case
Are You Really My Friend? Efficient and Secure Friend-matching in Mobile Social Networks
From Smashed Screens to Smashed Stacks: Attacking Mobile Phones using Malicious Aftermarket Parts

http://sems2017.cs.ru.nl/program.shtml

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SyScan360 Seattle

https://www.syscan360.org/

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Hardware.io 2017 CFP is open

Security Conference is a platform for hardware and security community where researchers showcase and discuss their innovative research on attacking and defending hardware. The objective of the conference revolves around four key concerns in hardware, firmware and related protocols i.e. backdoors, exploits, trust and attacks (BETA).

Training: 19th – 20th Sept 2017
Conference: 21st – 22nd Sept 2017
http://hardwear.io/

 

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UEFI lab at Cascadia IT Conference in Seattle March 10th

[DISCLAIMER: FirmwareSecurity is my personal blog. I work at PreOS Security.]

PreOs Security is offering a half-day training lab for System Administrators, SRE/DevOps in the Seattle area at Cascadia IT Conference, for those interested in learning about UEFI/ACPI/BIOS/SMM/etc security. Here’s the text for the training:

Defending System Firmware

Target audience: System administrators, SRE, DevOps who work with Intel UEFI-based server hardware

Most enterprises only defend operating system and application software; system and peripheral firmware (eg., BIOS, UEFI, PCIe, Thunderbolt, USB, etc) has many attack vectors. This workshop targets enterprise system administrators responsible for maintaining the security of their systems. The workshop is: an introduction to UEFI system firmware, an overview of the NIST secure BIOS platform lifecycle model of SP-(147,147b,155) and how to integrate that into normal enterprise hardware lifecycle management, and an introduction to the available open source firmware security tools created by security researchers and others, and how to integrate UEFI-based systems into the NIST lifecycle using available tools, to help protect your enterprise. It will be a 3.5 hour presentation, and at the end, you can optionally can run some tests on your laptop: Intel CHIPSEC, Linux UEFI Validation distribution (LUV-live), FirmWare Test Suite live boot distribution (FWTS-live), and a few other tools. Attendees trying to participate in the lab will need to have a modern Intel x86 or x64-based (not AMD), UEFI-based firmware, running Windows or Linux OS software. That means no AMD systems, no Apple Macbooks, no ARM systems. Any system used in the lab must have all data backed up, in case some tool bricks the device. Attendees should understand the basics of system hardware/firmware, be able to use a shell (eg, bash, cmd.exe, UEFI Shell), and able to use Python-based scripts.

https://www.casitconf.org/casitconf17/tutorials/

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