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Linaro releases Enterprise Reference Platform 17.12

ERP 17.12 has been released!

The goal of the Linaro Enterprise Reference Platform is to provide a fully tested, end to end, documented, open source implementation for ARM based Enterprise servers. The Reference Platform includes kernel, a community supported userspace and additional relevant open source projects, and is validated against existing firmware releases. The Linaro Enterprise Reference Platform is built and tested on Linaro Enterprise Group members hardware and the Linaro Developer Cloud. It is intended to be a reference example for use as a foundation for members and partners for their products based on open source technologies. The members and partners to include distribution, hyperscaler or OEM/ODM vendors, can leverage the reference for ARM in the datacenter.
[…]
– Focused on ACPI and UEFI use-cases.
[…]

http://releases.linaro.org/reference-platform/enterprise/17.12/
https://platforms.linaro.org/documentation/Reference-Platform/Platforms/Enterprise/ReleaseNotes-17.12.md/

More info: linaro-announce@lists.linaro.org list archives:
https://lists.linaro.org/mailman/listinfo/linaro-announce

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Pete Batard adds ARM support for VS2017 to Tianocore

Pete Batard  is adding Visual Studio for ARM support to the Tianocore UEFI dev toolchain:

This is a v2 of the previous patch, that takes into account the alignment of suppressed level 4 warnings between IA32, X64 and ARM, and that also removes compiler options that weren’t actually needed. The following series adds ARM compilation support for the VS2017 toolchain. With these patches, VS2017 toolchain users should be able to compile regular UEFI ARM applications using EDK2. Note that, unlike ARM64 support, ARM support does not require a specific update of Visual Studio 2017, as the ARM toolchain has been available from the very first release. We tested compiling and running the full UEFI Shell with this series, as well as a small set of applications and drivers, and found no issues. With an additional patch [1], it is also possible to use this proposal to compile a complete QEMU ARM firmware. As the patch shows, the changes that need to be applied to the EDK2 sources to achieve this are actually very minimal. However, the generated firmware does not currently boot, possibly because of the following warnings being generated by the MS compiler[…[]At this stage, since the goal of this series is to allow users to compile regular ARM UEFI applications using the VS2017 toolchain, I have non plans to spend more time on the QEMU firmware issues, especially as I suspect that reducing the firmware size back to 2 MB may not be achievable without Microsoft altering their compiler. I am however hopeful that ARM specialists can take this matter over eventually…

[1] https://github.com/pbatard/edk2/commit/c4ce41094a46f4f3dc7ccc64a90604813f037b13

More info:
http://pete.akeo.ie/2017/05/compiling-desktop-arm-applications-with.html
https://lists.01.org/mailman/listinfo/edk2-devel
https://visualstudio.uservoice.com/forums/121579-visual-studio-ide/suggestions/18614308-add-arm-support-back
https://blogs.msdn.microsoft.com/vcblog/2017/10/23/arm-gcc-cross-compilation-in-visual-studio/
https://github.com/microsoft/vslinux/issues
https://github.com/Microsoft/VSLinux/issues/110

See-also:
http://shadetail.com/blog/using-visual-studio-code-for-arm-development-introduction/

Note that Pete is not from the Microsoft Visual Studio team, he’s just doing their work for them… I hope the VS team gives Pete a complementary subscription to their commercial product! [Strange, I don’t think I’ve ever seen Microsoft add suppport for their own tools to Tianocore, it is always an external vendor that does Microsoft’s work…]

 

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Duo Labs releases: IDAPython, Coretex M Firmware and Amnesia modules

Examining Personal Protection Devices: Hardware and Firmware Research Methodology in Action
Todd Manning, Duo Labs
[…]This paper describes a methodology for retrieving device firmware, and for loading firmware into IDA Pro, a common disassembler. This paper focuses on the disassembly of this firmware, and the discussion of a novel approach to defeating readback protection discovered in one ARM Cortex M implementation. During the course of this research, I developed code for IDA Pro to assist in loading and grooming Cortex M firmware images. The IDAPython code is comprised of two modules. The first module annotates Cortex M vector tables, which gives IDA Pro hints about where code exists in the firmware image. The Cortex M module can automatically annotate firmware with a vector table located at the start of a firmware image, or can be tailored by the end user to work with relocated tables. The second module, called Amnesia, uses byte-level heuristics to detect ARM instructions in the firmware. Amnesia also contains heuristics that operate at the ARM instruction level to determine function boundaries based on common ARM function prologues and epilogues.[…]

Cortex M Firmware (cortex_m_firmware.py): This Cortex M Firmware module grooms an IDA Pro database containing firmware from an ARM Cortex M microcontroller. This module will annotate the firmware vector table, which contains a number of function pointers. This vector table annotation will cause IDA Pro to perform auto analysis against the functions these pointers point to. The Cortex M Firmware module also calls into the Amnesia module to automate discovery of additional code in the firmware image using the Amnesia heuristics.

Amnesia (amnesia.py): Amnesia is an IDAPython module designed to use byte level heuristics to find ARM thumb instructions in undefined bytes in an IDA Pro database. Currently, the heuristics in this module find code in a few different ways. Some instructions identify and define new code by looking for comon byte sequences that correspond to particular ARM opcodes. Other functions in this module define new functions based on sequences of defined instructions.

https://duo.com/blog/examining-personal-protection-devices-hardware-and-firmware-research-methodology-in-action

https://github.com/duo-labs/idapython

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new ARM instructions for 8.4-A*

The Arm Architecture is continually evolving, and this blog gives a high-level overview of some of the changes made in Armv8.4-A*. We develop these changes by listening to the Arm Ecosystem and working with them to provide new functionality that benefits everyone. These are incremental changes to the architecture and do not introduce any significant new features. Previous incremental versions of the architecture have been introduced for v8.3-A, v8.2-A, and v8.1-A. The rest of this blog introduces some of the new functionality. It does not offer a complete feature list. However, over the next few months we will be describing this functionality in more detail.[…]

https://community.arm.com/processors/b/blog/posts/introducing-2017s-extensions-to-the-arm-architecture

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ARM assembler quickref

ARM Assembly Basics Cheatsheet

This ARM assembly basics cheatsheet covers registers, instructions, branching, and conditional execution. You can use it as a guideline if you’re starting out with ARM assembly and need a little refresher of the basics.

https://azeria-labs.com/assembly-basics-cheatsheet/

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ARM IETF I-D changes from FUD to SUIT

Re: https://firmwaresecurity.com/2017/07/18/arm-ietf-id-on-iot-firmware-update-architecture/
It looks like the Internet Draft has changed from “fud” to “suit”:
https://tools.ietf.org/html/draft-moran-suit-architecture-00
The “fud” list is gone, and there is a new “suit” mailing list:
https://www1.ietf.org/mailman/listinfo/suit

A Firmware Update Architecture for Internet of Things Devices
draft-moran-suit-architecture-00
October 30, 2017

Vulnerabilities with IoT devices have raised the need for a solid and secure firmware update mechanism that is also suitable for constrained devices. Incorporating such update mechanism to fix vulnerabilities, to update configuration settings as well as adding new functionality is recommended by security experts. This document specifies requires and an architecture for a firmware update mechanism aimed for Internet of Things (IoT) devices. The architecture is agnostic to the transport of the firmware images and associated meta-data. This version of the document assumes asymmetric cryptography and a public key infrastructure. Future versions may also describe a symmetric key approach for very constrained devices.

 

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Fall UEFI Plugfest agenda

The Fall UEFI Plugfest is happening, a week of interop testing with UEFI vendors, along with some presentations. The presentation abstracts are below, see the full itenary for speaker bios.

http://www.uefi.org/events/upcoming

http://www.uefi.org/sites/default/files/resources/Agenda%20and%20Session%20Abstracts%20-%20Final_Oct%2024%202017.pdf

“Last Mile” Barriers to Removing Legacy BIOS (Intel)
While UEFI has become a dominant standard since its introduction in 2005, many use cases still rely on compatibility with PC/AT Legacy BIOS. These legacy corner cases are a barrier to completing the transition to modern firmware standards. Intel has identified maintaining compatibility as an issue for platform security and validation costs, and plans to eliminate legacy BIOS elements in our 2020 data center platforms. This session discusses “last mile” gaps for 16-bit compatibility and identifies UEFI capabilities that the industry can promote as alternatives, including HTTPS Boot, OS Recovery, and Signed Capsule Update.

UEFI Firmware – Security Concerns and Best Practices (Phoenix)
(no Abstract)

Strategies for Stronger Software SMI Security in UEFI Firmware (Insyde)
Avoid design errors and software coding pitfalls when implementing SMI handlers. Device manufacturers customize UEFI firmware using new runtime interfaces that are implemented using software SMIs. Heavy customization, tight deadlines and poor code implementation can accidentally allow malware to abuse the power of SMM. This session focuses on four common software SMI vulnerabilities and how to change your UEFI firmware and applications to avoid them.

Advances of UEFI Technologies in ARM Systems (ARM)
This session will discuss the ARM-related interfaces defined in the latest UEFI and ACPI specifications, the requirements of the UEFI and ACPI interfaces for the SBBR Specification, and the use of UEFI SCT and FWTS in the SBBR compliance test. Also, discussed will be the required UEFI interfaces for the embedded space when the separation of the device and OS development is desired.

Introduction to the Self-Certification Test (SCT) in UEFI World (Canonical and Intel)
The UEFI Test Working Group (UTWG) endorses two test suites: Firmware Test Suite (FWTS) and the UEFI Self-Certification Test (SCT). FWTS is focused on validating Linux compatibility, and is endorsed by UTWG for ACPI validation. The UEFI SCT is designed to validate firmware and driver behavior per the UEFI Specification. This session demonstrates the operation of both tools, and discusses how they use open source models to improve test quality.

Firmware Test Suite Introduction: Uses, Development, Contribution and GPL (Canonical)
Firmware Test Suite (FWTS) is the recommended ACPI 6.1 Self-Certification Test (SCT). This command line tool is easy to use and provides explanatory and informative. Its open-source nature allows developers to add new tests easily, and many code examples such as ACPI, UEFI and SMBIOS are available for references. Code contribution are appreciated and technical discussion and code reviews on the mailing list are answered by an active community. As licensed by GPL, FWTS ensures it is available and suitable to everyone who wants to use it publicly and privately.

NFC and UEFI (AMI)
NFC is a technology that has permeated many aspects of everyday life. Using NFC, you can now pay with your phone or enter secure building areas. However, the UEFI specification lacks any implementation of NFC. AMI will cover a proposed solution for NFC implementation in UEFI, how to best fit NFC into the UEFI specification, and potential use cases.

Edk2 Platforms Overview (Linaro)
For a couple of years now, the Linaro OpenPlatformPkg repository has been used to collate a number of (at least partially) open source EDK2 platform ports. However, with a now properly defined process for the TianoCore edk2-platforms and edk2-non-osi repositories, these platforms are now moving over there and OpenPlatformPkg. This session will discuss the process, the current state of things and the practicalities of working with edk2-platforms.

UEFI Manageability and REST Services (HPE and Intel)
With the increase in platform firmware complexity and capabilities, there is an increased need to standard firmware manageability is increasing. The UEFI 2.7 Specification defines REST services to provide secure solutions for managing modern platforms. This session describes enterprise configuration scenarios, discusses implementation gaps in the UEFI specification, and proposes enhancements related to vendor-specific REST services.

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