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Intel ATR releases UEFI firmware training materials!

Good news: the Intel Advanced Threat Research (ATR) team has release some of their UEFI security training materials!

This repository contains materials for a hands-on training ‘Security of BIOS/UEFI System Firmware from Attacker and Defender Perspectives’. A variety of attacks targeting system firmware have been discussed publicly, drawing attention to the pre-boot and firmware components of the platform such as BIOS and SMM, OS loaders and secure booting. This training will detail and organize objectives, attack vectors, vulnerabilities and exploits against various types of system firmware such as legacy BIOS, SMI handlers and UEFI based firmware, mitigations as well as tools and methods available to analyze security of such firmware components. It will also detail protections available in hardware and in firmware such as Secure Boot implemented by modern operating systems against bootkits. The training includes theoretical material describing a structured approach to system firmware security analysis and mitigations as well as many hands-on exercises to test system firmware for vulnerabilities. After the training you should have basic understanding of platform hardware components and various types of system firmware, security objectives and attacks against system firmware, mitigations available in hardware and firmware. You should be able to apply this knowledge in practice to identify vulnerabilities in BIOS and perform forensic analysis of the firmware.

0 Introduction to Firmware Security
1 BIOS and UEFI Firmware Fundamentals
2 Bootkits and UEFI Secure Boot
3 Hands-On Platform Hardware and Firmware
4 System Firmware Attack Vectors
5 Hands-On EFI Environment
6 Mitigations
7 System Firmware Forensics
N Miscellaneous Materials

https://github.com/advanced-threat-research/firmware-security-training

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UEFI-SecureBoot-SignTool

Aneesh Neelam has written UEFI-SecureBoot-SignTool, a script to sign external Linux kernel modules for UEFI Secure Boot.


UEFI Secure Boot sign tool

The default signed Linux kernel on Ubuntu (>=16.04.x), Fedora (>=18) and perhaps on other distributions as well, won’t load unsigned external kernel modules if Secure Boot is enabled on UEFI systems. Hence, any external kernel modules like the proprietary Nvidia kernel driver, Oracle VM VirtualBox’s host/guest kernel driver etc. won’t work. External kernel modules must be signed for UEFI Secure Boot using a Machine Owner Key (MOK). You can use the UEFI Secure Boot Sign Tool to sign kernel modules. This is useful if you can’t or don’t wish to disable Secure Boot on your UEFI-enabled system.[…]

https://github.com/aneesh-neelam/UEFI-SecureBoot-SignTool

 

 

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Secure Boot BOF at DebConf17

Helen Koike of Collabora has proposed a BOF on UEFI Secure Boot at DebConf17, this August:

DebConf17 – BoF proposal to discuss secure boot
I want to send a BoF proposal to DebConf17 so we can meet there and discuss about secure boot. I would like to know if you are interested in attending and also which topics you suggest for discussion. I would appreciate if you could put your name and suggestions in this form in case you are interested https://goo.gl/forms/lHoEibY1H6FmSHSJ2 , or just reply to this email thread.

For full message, see the debian-efi mailing list archives.

https://lists.debian.org/debian-efi/2017/05/threads.html

https://docs.google.com/forms/d/e/1FAIpQLSdtHYNy9212iXP26tkjbb6XvgVSMjJzn2DYoAilFT1l89vemw/viewform?c=0&w=1

https://debconf17.debconf.org/

 

 

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