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LUV announces v2.1-rc2 release

Ricardo Neri of Intel posted a LONG announcement about LUV V2.1-rc2, most of which included here. There are a LOT of new features in this LUV release!

This is to announce the release of LUV v2.1-rc2. It has been a while since the last time of our last release. This is not the ideal release cadence are working to make changes. We will now release more frequently. We aim to release a new version every 4-5 weeks with the content we accumulate over that period of time. Given the large number of new features and changes in this release, it made sense to release it as rc2 of v2.1 to allow for issues to arise and stabilize towards the next release cycle.

This release include the client side of our telemetrics solution. This solution is based on the implementation done for Clear Linux[1]; abiding Intel privacy policies[2]. Please note that telemetrics is an opt-in feature and is disabled by default and only works for systems within Intel networks. We will work now on the server side of the solution.

In this release we have migrated from systemV to systemd, which is inline with most Linux distributions. Also, our telemetrics client needed it to function. Megha Dey did all the heavy lifting to migrate to systemd; which was not an easy task (kudos to her!). She worked on stabilizing network and revamping our splash screen, which now uses plymouth.

Sai Praneeth Prakhya extended our existing implementation to detect illegal access to UEFI Boot Services memory regions after boot. His extension now allows to detect such access to also conventional memory. Likewise, it now detects these acceses at runtime and long after UEFI SetVirtualAddressMap. This has been quite useful recently to detect bugs related to UEFI capsules in certain firmware implementations.

Gayatri Kammela worked on providing tools to make the netboot images more useful. She completed a reference implementation of an HTTP server to collect test results in a test farm. The documentation of this implementation can be found here[2]; we don’t provide collection services. Of course, the client-side implementation of this solution is part of this release. Along with this solution, she wrote a script to customize a netboot binary (an EFI application) to work with her reference implementation[4].

Naresh Bhat updated the kernel configuration for aarch64. He also worked on providing a more clean, unified and structured kernel command line for all the supported CPU architectures. He also enabled support of netboot images for aarch64.

Fathi Boudra kindly reworked the kernel configuration fragments to avoid unnecessary duplications.

Matt Hart added a new luv.poweroff option.

Configuration of LUV has been simplified by moving all the parameters that the user might configure a LUV.cfg file found in the boot partition of the disk image. No more meddling with the grub.cfg configuration file.

We now provide images built for both GPT and MBR partition schemes.

Updated test suites: We include FWTS V17.03.00, CHIPSEC v1.2.5 plus all the changes available as of this week towards the release of v.1.2.6, which should be coming soon. BITS was bumped to v2079. We use Linux v4.10. This release is based on the Morty version of the Yocto Project.

meta-oe and updates to the build process: Our build process changed a bit. We now include certain components from the  meta-oe layer[5]. Such layer has been added to our repository, but it still need to be added locally to the build/conf/bblayers.conf file when building.

Binary images for x86: A announcement to download binary images for x86 will be sent this week.

See rest of announcement for list of Known Issues, and Fixed Issues.

[1] https://clearlinux.org/features/telemetry
[2] http://www.intel.com/content/www/us/en/privacy/intel-privacy.html
[3] https://github.com/01org/luv-yocto/wiki/Send–LUV-test-results-to-an-HTTP-server
[4] https://github.com/01org/luv-yocto/wiki/Using-LUV-Script-modify_luv_netboot_efi.py
[5] https://layers.openembedded.org/layerindex/branch/master/layer/meta-oe/

Full announcement:
https://lists.01.org/mailman/listinfo/luv

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Hyper-V UEFI bootloader complexities

[…]Forcing GRUB installation to EFI removable media path does basically the same thing as when Ubuntu installer asks you if you want to force UEFI installation: it installs to the removable media path in the ESP (EFI System Partition). This is fine for environment where no other operating system is present. However if there is another operating system present on the device which depends on this fallback location “removable media path” it will make this system temporary unbootable (you can manually configure GRUB later to boot it if necessary though). Windows installer for example *also* installs to the removable media path in the ESP. All OS installers installing things to this removable media path will conflict with any other such installers and that’s why in Debian (and Ubuntu) installers don’t do this by default. You explicitly have to select UEFI mode during the normal installation (what I did).[…]

https://blog.jhnr.ch/2017/02/23/resolving-no-x64-based-uefi-boot-loader-was-found-when-starting-ubuntu-virtual-machine/

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Linux Foundation workstation security ebook

[…]Now, before you even start with your operating system installation, there are a few things you should consider to ensure your pre-boot environment is up to snuff. You will want to make sure:
* UEFI boot mode is used (not legacy BIOS) (ESSENTIAL)
* A password is required to enter UEFI configuration (ESSENTIAL)
* SecureBoot is enabled (ESSENTIAL)
* A UEFI-level password is required to boot the system (NICE-to-HAVE)

https://www.linux.com/news/linux-workstation-security/2017/3/4-security-steps-take-you-install-linux

http://go.linuxfoundation.org/workstation_security_ebook

Sounds interesting, but I don’t see any actual download link for this ebook. I guess I need some sleep.

There is also this: https://firmwaresecurity.com/2015/08/31/linux-foundation-it-security-policies-firmware-guidance/

 

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Linux Kernel Podcast returns

After being offine since 2009, the Linux Kernel podcast has restarted. The first new episode mentions an EFI/ACPI patch!

Bhupesh Sharma posted a patch moving in-kernel handling of ACPI BGRT (Boot(time) Graphics Resource) tables out of the x86 architecture tree and into drivers/firmware/efi (so that it can be shared with the 64-bit ARM Architecture).

http://www.kernelpodcast.org/2017/02/20/kernel-podcast-for-feb-20th-2017/

http://www.kernelpodcast.org/

http://jcm.libsyn.com/rss

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