BlueHat Israel video: Beyond Belief: The Case of Spectre and Meltdown

http://www.bluehatil.com/files/Beyond%20Belief%20-%20The%20Case%20of%20Spectre%20and%20Meltdown.pdf

https://gruss.cc/

https://meltdownattack.com/

Spectre & Meltdown vulnerability/mitigation checker for Linux

A shell script to tell if your system is vulnerable against the several “speculative execution” CVEs that were made public in 2018.

CVE-2017-5753 [bounds check bypass] aka ‘Spectre Variant 1’
CVE-2017-5715 [branch target injection] aka ‘Spectre Variant 2’
CVE-2017-5754 [rogue data cache load] aka ‘Meltdown’ aka ‘Variant 3’
CVE-2018-3640 [rogue system register read] aka ‘Variant 3a’
CVE-2018-3639 [speculative store bypass] aka ‘Variant 4’
CVE-2018-3615, CVE-2018-3620, CVE-2018-3646 [L1 terminal fault] aka ‘Foreshadow & Foreshadow-

https://www.cnx-software.com/2018/08/17/check-spectre-meltdown-l1-terminal-fault-linux/amp/

https://github.com/speed47/spectre-meltdown-checker/

Two Spectre, Meltodown, and Rowhammer talks from Blackhat

https://mlq.me/download/bhusa2018_meltdown_slides.pdf

https://gruss.cc/files/us-18-Gruss-Another-Flip-In-The-Row.pdf

Microsoft Blackhat speculative execution slides posted

https://github.com/Microsoft/MSRC-Security-Research/blob/master/presentations/2018_08_BlackHatUSA/us-18-Fogh-Ertl-Wrangling-with-the-Ghost-An-Inside-Story-of-Mitigating-Speculative-Execution-Side-Channel-Vulnerabilities.pdf

NetSpectre

https://misc0110.net/web/files/netspectre.pdf

Red Hat: SPECTRE Variant 1 scanning tool

As part of Red Hat’s commitment to product security we have developed a tool internally that can be used to scan for variant 1 SPECTRE vulnerabilities. As part of our commitment to the wider user community, we are introducing this tool via this article. […] The tool currently only supports the x86_64 and AArch64 architectures. We do hope to add additional architectures in the future.[…]

https://access.redhat.com/blogs/766093/posts/3510331

https://people.redhat.com/~nickc/Spectre_Scanner/scanner.tar.xz

LLVM: Introduce a new pass to do Speculative Load Hardening (SLH) to mitigate Spectre variant 1

A new speculative load hardening pass was added for X86, aiming to mitigate Spectre variant #1

http://llvmweekly.org/issue/237

https://reviews.llvm.org/rL336990

 

Huawei: Security Advisory – Side-Channel Vulnerability Variants 3a and 4

SA No:huawei-sa-20180615-01-cpu
Initial Release Date: Jun 15, 2018
Last Release Date: Jul 17, 2018

Intel publicly disclosed new variants of the side-channel central processing unit (CPU) hardware vulnerabilities known as Spectre and Meltdown. These variants known as 3A (CVE-2018-3640)and 4 (CVE-2018-3639), local attackers may exploit these vulnerabilities to cause information leak on the affected system. (Vulnerability ID: HWPSIRT-2018-05139 and HWPSIRT-2018-05140).[…]

https://www.huawei.com/en/psirt/security-advisories/huawei-sa-20180615-01-cpu-en

IBM: UEFI fixes for Spectre variants 4 and 3a (CVE-2018-3639 CVE-2018-3640)

https://www.ibm.com/blogs/psirt/ibm-security-bulletin-ibm-has-released-unified-extensible-firmware-interface-uefi-fixes-in-response-to-spectre-variants-4-and-3a-cve-2018-3639-cve-2018-3640/

GCC: Mitigation against unsafe data speculation (CVE-2017-5753)

The patches I posted earlier this year for mitigating against
CVE-2017-5753 (Spectre variant 1) attracted some useful feedback, from
which it became obvious that a rethink was needed. This mail, and the
following patches attempt to address that feedback and present a new
approach to mitigating against this form of attack surface.[…]

https://gcc.gnu.org/ml/gcc-patches/2018-07/msg00423.html

 

ACM SIGArch: Speculating about speculation: on the (lack of) security guarantees of Spectre-V1 mitigations

Spectre and Meltdown opened the Pandora box of a new class of speculative execution attacks that defeat standard memory protection mechanisms. These attacks are not theoretical, they pose a real and immediate security threat, and have been reportedly exploited by cybercriminals.[…]

https://www.sigarch.org/speculating-about-speculation-on-the-lack-of-security-guarantees-of-spectre-v1-mitigations/

 

SafeSpec: Banishing the Spectre of a Meltdown with Leakage-Free Speculation

Submitted on 13 Jun 2018

Speculative execution which is used pervasively in modern CPUs can leave side effects in the processor caches and other structures even when the speculated instructions do not commit and their direct effect is not visible. The recent Meltdown and Spectre attacks have shown that this behavior can be exploited to expose privileged information to an unprivileged attacker. In particular, the attack forces the speculative execution of a code gadget that will carry out the illegal read, which eventually gets squashed, but which leaves a side-channel trail that can be used by the attacker to infer the value. Several attack variations are possible, allowing arbitrary exposure of the full kernel memory to an unprivileged attacker. In this paper, we introduce a new model (SafeSpec) for supporting speculation in a way that is immune to side-channel leakage necessary for attacks such as Meltdown and Spectre. In particular, SafeSpec stores side effects of speculation in a way that is not visible to the attacker while the instructions are speculative. The speculative state is then either committed to the main CPU structures if the branch commits, or squashed if it does not, making all direct side effects of speculative code invisible. The solution must also address the possibility of a covert channel from speculative instructions to committed instructions before these instructions are committed. We show that SafeSpec prevents all three variants of Spectre and Meltdown, as well as new variants that we introduce. We also develop a cycle accurate model of modified design of an x86-64 processor and show that the performance impact is negligible. We build prototypes of the hardware support in a hardware description language to show that the additional overhead is small. We believe that SafeSpec completely closes this class of attacks, and that it is practical to implement.

https://arxiv.org/abs/1806.05179

FreeBSD 11.2R released, with speculative execution and UEFI updates

The latest version of FreeBSD is out, and has a few speculative execution and UEFI changes, including:

https://www.freebsd.org/releases/11.2R/relnotes.html

[arm64] The bsdinstall(8) installer has been updated to default to UEFI-only boot. [r322254]
(Sponsored by The FreeBSD Foundation)

The efibootmgr(8) utility has been added, which is used to manipulate the EFI boot manager. [r332126]
(Sponsored by Netflix)

https://www.freebsd.org/cgi/man.cgi?query=efibootmgr&sektion=8&manpath=freebsd-release-ports

The cpucontrol(8) utility has been updated to include a new flag, -e, which is used to re-evaluate reported CPU features after applying firmware updates. [r327871]
Note: The cpucontrol(8) -e flag should only be used after microcode update have been applied to all CPUs in the system, otherwise system instability may be experienced if processor features are not identical across the system.

https://www.freebsd.org/cgi/man.cgi?query=cpucontrol&sektion=8&manpath=freebsd-release-ports

FreeBSD-SA-18:03.speculative_execution 14 March 2018.  Speculative Execution Vulnerabilities
Note: This advisory addresses the most significant issues for FreeBSD 11.x on amd64 CPUs. We expect to update this advisory to include i386 and other CPUs.

https://www.freebsd.org/security/advisories/FreeBSD-SA-18:03.speculative_execution.asc

Graz: School on Security and Correctness in the IoT 2018

Welcome to our second School on Security & Correctness in the Internet of Things 2018, held from 3.-9. September. It is hosted by the research center “Dependable Internet of Things“, located at Graz University of Technology. This school targets graduate students interested in security aspects of tomorrow’s IoT devices. Current advances in technology drive miniaturization and efficiency of computing devices, opening a variety of novel use cases like autonomous transportation, smart cities and health monitoring devices. However, device malfunction could potentially threaten human welfare or even life. Malfunction might not only be caused by design errors but also by intentional impairment. As computing devices are supposed to have high and permanent network connectivity, an attacker finding a vulnerability might easily target millions of devices at once. Moreover, integration of computing devices in everyday items exposes them to a potentially hostile physical environment. A central requirement of tomorrow’s IoT is the ability to execute software dependably on all kinds of devices. IoT devices need to provide security in the presence of network attacks as well as against attackers having physical access to the device. During the five-day school, participants will gain awareness of these IoT-related challenges. Introductory classes are supplemented by advanced courses in the area of system security, cryptography as well as software and hardware side-channels. During spare time participants are invited to enjoy the city of Graz and attend organized events.

https://www.securityweek.at/school/

Chromium: Post-Spectre Threat Model Re-Think

https://twitter.com/fugueish/status/1001605230583136256

In light of Spectre/Meltdown, we needed to re-think our threat model and defenses for Chrome renderer processes. Spectre is a new class of hardware side-channel attack that affects (among many other targets) web browsers. This document describes the impact of these side-channel attacks and our approach to mitigating them. The upshot of the latest developments is that the folks working on this from the V8 side are increasingly convinced that there is no viable alternative to Site Isolation as a systematic mitigation to SSCAs [speculative side-channel attacks]. In this new mental model, we have to assume that user code can reliably gain access to all data within a renderer process through speculation. This means that we definitely need some sort of ‘privileged/PII data isolation’ guarantees as well, for example ensuring that password and credit card info are not speculatively loaded into a renderer process without user consent. […] In fact, any software that both (a) runs (native or interpreted) code from more than one source; and (b) attempts to create a security boundary inside a single address space, is potentially affected. For example, software that processes document formats with scripting capabilities, and which loads multiple documents from different sources into the same process, may need to take defense measures similar to those described here.[…]

https://chromium.googlesource.com/chromium/src/+/master/docs/security/side-channel-threat-model.md