sb-kmod-signload.sh: UEFI Secure Boot sign and load utility for Linux kernel modules

This script provides commands to sign a designated list of kernel modules and loads them via modprobe into the linux kernel. This was built to specfically address the issue of having to re-sign and reload kernel modules after upgrading the linux kernel, so they are not rejected by UEFI Secure Boot. (e.g. virtualbox kernel modules). As an example, this script is defaulted to load virtualbox kernel modules and will look for the private key and x509 cert in a specific directory. Please change these values inside the script as needed.[…]

https://github.com/plyint/sb-kmod-signload.sh

 

 

UK Gov security guidance for Ubuntu, including Secure Boot

The UK government has guidance on secure usage of Ubuntu. It appears to be newly-written.

Lots of useful information, and it mentions that Secure Boot is only active at some time: nice to see that level of detail.

https://www.ncsc.gov.uk/guidance/eud-security-guidance-ubuntu-1804-lts

Secure Boot section:

Secure boot validates the bootloader, kernel and kernel modules. However, some boot-related files are not protected by default and could be modified by an attacker to tamper with the boot process. Hardening of the boot process can help mitigate the risk.

Ubuntu does not use any dedicated hardware to protect its disk encryption keys. If an attacker can get physical access to the device, they can perform an offline brute-force attack to recover the encryption password.

Encryption keys protecting sensitive data remain available to an attacker when the device is locked. This means that if the device is attacked while powered on and locked, keys and data on the device may be compromised without the attacker knowing the password.

Booting Secure [on Apple systems]

http://michaellynn.github.io/2018/07/27/booting-secure/

PS: A few articles on the new T2 processor as well:

https://www.computerworld.com/article/3290415/apple-mac/the-macbook-pro-s-t2-chip-boosts-enterprise-security.html

https://www.digitaltrends.com/computing/apple-t2-chip-brings-deeper-secuirty-to-macbook-pro/

The MacBook Pro’s T2 chip boosts enterprise security: Secure boot, even for Windows installations on a Mac

Apple: new/updated T2 chip and Secure Boot support articles

Re: https://firmwaresecurity.com/2018/07/12/apple-releases-new-systems-with-t2-chip-and-uefi-secureboot/ and

https://firmwaresecurity.com/2017/12/20/apple-kb-article-on-secure-boot/

the latter Apple support article on Secure Boot has been updated recently:

About Secure Boot

https://support.apple.com/en-us/HT208330

Mac computers that have the Apple T2 chip

https://support.apple.com/en-us/HT208862

Apple releases new systems with T2 chip and UEFI SecureBoot

https://www.apple.com/newsroom/2018/07/apple-updates-macbook-pro-with-faster-performance-and-new-features-for-pros/

Ubuntu: DKMS modules need to be configured to work with UEFI Secure Boot

I just noticed this nice document on Ubuntu security features, maybe it is new, maybe I never noticed it before:

https://wiki.ubuntu.com/Security/Features#secure-boot

I also notice this page, which I believe has recently been updated:

DKMS modules need to be configured to work with UEFI Secure Boot

Ubuntu is now checking module signing by default, on kernels 4.4.0-18.34, 4.4.0-21.37, 4.2.0-42.49, 3.19.0-65.73 and 3.13.0-92.139 onwards. You can read more details in this bug in Launchpad. Because of those changes, DKMS modules will not work on systems with Secure Boot enabled unless correctly configured. In order to make DKMS work, Secure Boot signing keys for the system must be imported in the system firmware, otherwise Secure Boot needs to be disabled. There are several methods to configure your system to properly load DKMS modules with Secure Boot enabled.

https://wiki.ubuntu.com/UEFI/SecureBoot/DKMS

https://bugs.launchpad.net/ubuntu/+source/linux/+bug/1566221

 

VMWare: Enable or Disable UEFI Secure Boot for a Virtual Machine

I believe this is a new (or revised) document [to me].

[…]VMware Tools version 10.1 or later is required for virtual machines that use UEFI secure boot. You can upgrade those virtual machines to a later version of VMware Tools when it becomes available.

For Linux virtual machines, VMware Host-Guest Filesystem is not supported in secure boot mode. Remove VMware Host-Guest Filesystem from VMware Tools before you enable secure boot.[…]

https://docs.vmware.com/en/VMware-vSphere/6.5/com.vmware.vsphere.security.doc/GUID-898217D4-689D-4EB5-866C-888353FE241C.html

 

RISC-V: Secure Boot and Remote Attestation in the Sanctum Processor

Cryptology ePrint Archive: Report 2018/427

Secure Boot and Remote Attestation in the Sanctum Processor

During the secure boot process for a trusted execution environment, the processor must provide a chain of certificates to the remote client demonstrating that their secure container was established as specified. This certificate chain is rooted at the hardware manufacturer who is responsible for constructing chips according to the correct specification and provisioning them with key material. We consider a semi-honest manufacturer who is assumed to construct chips correctly, but may attempt to obtain knowledge of client private keys during the process. Using the RISC-V Rocket chip architecture as a base, we design, document, and implement an attested execution processor that does not require secure non-volatile memory, nor a private key explicitly assigned by the manufacturer. Instead, the processor derives its cryptographic identity from manufacturing variation measured by a Physical Unclonable Function (PUF). Software executed by a bootloader built into the processor transforms the PUF output into an elliptic curve key pair. The (re)generated private key is used to sign trusted portions of the boot image, and is immediately destroyed. The platform can therefore provide attestations about its state to remote clients. Reliability and security of PUF keys are ensured through the use of a trapdoor computational fuzzy extractor.

We present detailed evaluation results for secure boot and attestation by a client of a Rocket chip implementation on a Xilinx Zynq 7000 FPGA.

https://eprint.iacr.org/2018/427

https://eprint.iacr.org/2018/427.pdf

Lenovo LEN-20241: System x Secure Boot Vulnerability

System x Secure Boot Vulnerability
Lenovo Security Advisory: LEN-20241
Potential Impact: Booting unauthenticated code
Severity: High
Scope of Impact: Lenovo-only
CVE Identifier: CVE-2017-3775

Lenovo internal testing discovered some System x server BIOS/UEFI versions that, when Secure Boot mode is enabled by a system administrator, do not properly authenticate signed code before booting it. As a result, an attacker with physical access to the system could boot unsigned code. Lenovo ships these systems with Secure Boot disabled by default, because signed code is relatively new in the data center environment, and standard operator configurations disable signature checking. Apply the BIOS/UEFI update appropriate for your model described in the product impact section below. If you are relying on Secure Boot, you may want to control physical access to systems prior to applying the updates.[…]

https://support.lenovo.com/us/en/solutions/len-20241
https://threatpost.com/lenovo-patches-arbitrary-code-execution-flaw/131725/

On the Path to a Secure Boot Solution for RISC-V

On the Path to a Secure Boot Solution for RISC-V
By SecureRF | April 26, 2018 | 0

As the RISC-V ISA gains in popularity and more industries proceed with plans to build and deploy systems based on RISC-V technologies, the security requirements of those systems will grow. One avenue that hackers have used to exploit systems has been to modify the firmware and cause it to misbehave. For example, one of the recent vehicle hacks involved corrupting firmware in order to jump from an infotainment center to the CAN-BUS. The solution to this style of attack is a secure boot, and with minimal additions to the ISA, RISC-V can provide secure boot hooks directly. Secure boot is a self-hosted root of trust that uses a digital signature and a known, trusted, public key to protect the firmware before it loads. The RISC-V system validates the signature over the firmware using the trusted public key and will run the code only if the signature verifies correctly. If the firmware has been modified in any way, the signature validation will fail. Once this initial trusted load completes, subsequent loads can use the same process to chain the trust to additional loads.[…]

https://www.securerf.com/path-secure-boot-solution-risc-v/

GetSecureBootPolicy.ps1: Partially-completed Secure Boot policy parser

Re: https://firmwaresecurity.com/2018/03/31/geoff-chappell-secure-boot-internals/

https://github.com/mattifestation/BCD

Click on above URL or remove spaces in below URL (WordPress mangles Github Gist URLs…)

https://gist. github.com/mattifestation /f1e160bc970c8a7b82355d7e5946901b

Oracle Solaris 11.4: UEFI Secure Boot on Intel HW

UEFI Secure Boot on Oracle Solaris x86 enables you to install and boot Oracle Solaris on platforms where UEFI Secure Boot is enabled. This feature provides more security by maintaining a chain of trust during boot: digital signatures of the firmware and software are verified before executing the next stage. No break occurs in the chain because of unsigned, corrupt, or rogue firmware or software during the boot process. This feature helps assure that the firmware and software used to boot Oracle Solaris on a hardware platform is correct, and has not been modified or corrupted.

https://docs.oracle.com/cd/E72435_01/html/E72445/grijo.html
https://docs.oracle.com/cd/E37838_01/html/E60974/index.html
https://blogs.oracle.com/solaris/oracle-solaris-114-beta-released
https://github.com/oracle/solaris-userland/tree/master/components/shim
https://www.phoronix.com/scan.php?page=news_item&px=Oracle-Linux-7-Update-4

 

 

MacAdmins Podcast: Episode 70: Secure Boot

Synopsis: Tim Perfitt joins the pod to talk about SecureBoot, the iMac Pro, the future of securing everything, and the history of BootRunner and other products at Twocanoes.

Your Hosts:
Tom Bridge, Partner at Technolutionary LLC [@tbridge]
Pepijn Bruienne, R&D Engineer at Duo Security [@bruienne], Proprietor of EnterpriseMac.Bruienne.com
Charles Edge, Director of Marketplace at Jamf, [@cedge318]

Guests: Tim Perfitt, Founder of Twocanoes Software

https://podcast.macadmins.org/2018/02/21/episode-70-tim-perfitt-twocanoes-software/

show notes:

https://twocanoes.com/secureboot-imac-pro/

Dell Sputnik systems disable Secure Boot

“Dell ship their Sputnik systems with a pre-populated MokSB variable that disables Secure Boot, so this is working as intended on the Fedora side.”

https://bugzilla.redhat.com/show_bug.cgi?id=1544794

Payment card Industry: Secure Boot == Verified Boot == “Trusted Boot”

I just noticed that the PCI compliance group lumps all of the Trusted/Measured/Verified/Secure boot technologies into one, and calls it Trusted Boot, which, AFAIK, is the name for Intel TXT-based Trusted Boot. I wish they were more precise. Then again, I guess I should be glad there is *SOME* firmware security in the PCI compliance docs, I wish there was more, system should check firmware-based code for malware, not just OS-based code.

Payment Card Industry (PCI)
Software-based PIN Entry on COTS Security Requirements
Version 1.0, January 2018
[…]
The PIN CVM Application must only support platforms that, at a minimum, provide the following features:

* An enforcing mandatory access control framework
* A “trusted boot” mechanism that validates the operating system’s authenticity

Trusted Boot: A cryptographic process where the bootloader verifies the integrity of all components (e.g., kernel objects) loaded during operating system start-up process, before loading. Also known as Verified Boot and Secure Boot (e.g., Google or Apple).
[…]

https://www.pcisecuritystandards.org/ptsdocs/RP450RP456RP457_PCI_Security_Policy-1461704231.78085.pdf

 

Aleph Security: Firehorse: Research & Exploitation framework for Qualcomm EDL (Firehose)

Exploiting Qualcomm EDL Programmers (1): Gaining Access & PBL Internals
By Roee Hay (@roeehay) & Noam Hadad
January 22, 2018
* QPSIIR-909, ALEPH-2017029, CVE-2017-13174, CVE-2017-5947

There are many guides across the Internet for ‘unbricking’ Qualcomm-based mobile devices. All of these guides make use of Emergency Download Mode (EDL), an alternate boot-mode of the Qualcomm Boot ROM (Primary Bootloader). To make any use of this mode, users must get hold of OEM-signed programmers, which seem to be publicly available for various such devices. While the reason of their public availability is unknown, our best guess is that these programmers are often leaked from OEM device repair labs. Some OEMs (e.g. Xiaomi) also publish them on their official forums. […] In this 5-part blog post we discuss the security implications of the leaked programmers. The first part presents some internals of the PBL, EDL, Qualcomm Sahara and programmers, focusing on Firehose. In Part 2, we discuss storage-based attacks exploiting a functionality of EDL programmers – we will see a few concrete examples such as unlocking the Xiaomi Note 5A (codename ugglite) bootloader in order to install and load a malicious boot image thus breaking the chain-of-trust. Part 3, Part 4 & Part 5 are dedicated for the main focus of our research – memory based attacks. In Part 3 we exploit a hidden functionality of Firehose programmers in order to execute code with highest privileges (EL3) in some devices, allowing us, for example, to dump the Boot ROM (PBL) of various SoCs. We then present our exploit framework, firehorse, which implements a runtime debugger for firehose programmers (Part 4). We end with a complete Secure-Boot bypass attack for Nokia 6 MSM8937, that uses our exploit framework. We achieve code execution in the PBL (or more accurately, in a PBL clone), allowing us to defeat the chain of trust, gaining code execution in every part of the bootloader chain, including TrustZone, and the High Level OS (Android) itself.

The merit of our research is as follows:
* We describe the Qualcomm EDL (Firehose) and Sahara Protocols. (Part 1)
* We created firehorse, a publicly available research framework for Firehose-based programmers, capable of debugging/tracing the programmer (and the rest of the bootloader chain, including the Boot ROM itself, on some devices). (Part 3 & Part 4)
* We obtained and reverse-engineered the PBL of various Qualcomm-based chipsets (MSM8994/MSM8917/MSM8937/MSM8953/MSM8974) using the Firehose programmers and our research framework. (Part 3)
* We obtained the RPM & Modem PBLs of Nexus 6P (MSM8994). (Part 3)
* We managed to unlock & root various Android Bootloaders, such as Xiaomi Note 5A, using a storage-based attack only. (Part 2)
* We managed to manifest an end-to-end attack against our Nokia 6 device running Snapdragon 425 (MSM8937). We believe this attack is also applicable for Nokia 5, and might be even extensible to other devices, although unverified. (Part 5)

Research & Exploitation framework for Qualcomm EDL Firehorse programmers
https://github.com/alephsecurity/firehorse

Exploiting Qualcomm EDL Programmers (1): Gaining Access & PBL Internals
https://alephsecurity.com/2018/01/22/qualcomm-edl-1/

Exploiting Qualcomm EDL Programmers (2): Storage-based Attacks & Rooting
https://alephsecurity.com/2018/01/22/qualcomm-edl-2/

Exploiting Qualcomm EDL Programmers (3): Memory-based Attacks & PBL Extraction
https://alephsecurity.com/2018/01/22/qualcomm-edl-3/

Exploiting Qualcomm EDL Programmers (4): Runtime Debugger
https://alephsecurity.com/2018/01/22/qualcomm-edl-4/

Exploiting Qualcomm EDL Programmers (5): Breaking Nokia 6’s Secure Boot
https://alephsecurity.com/2018/01/22/qualcomm-edl-5/