AMI announces NVMe UEFI Option ROM service for OEMs

American Megatrends Provides Service for Developing NVMe UEFI Option ROMs for UEFI BIOS Firmware

AMI is pleased to announce new service for developing NVMe® UEFI Option ROMs. Recently, AMI added support for technologies such as NVMe metadata/data encryption and NVMe namespace management. Continuing its support for NVMe-related technologies, AMI has also developed UEFI NVMe Option ROMs. This service for developing UEFI NVMe Option ROMs enables OEMs and NVMe device manufacturers to ship NVMe devices with Option ROMs embedded in them. OEMs and NVMe device manufacturers will have the ability to add features that are traditionally unavailable with generic UEFI drivers and can implement vendor-specific commands and features within their devices. Some of the additional features that are available for NVMe Option ROMs include disk management for namespace management in BIOS setup, metadata/end-to-end data protection, NVMe firmware updates in BIOS setup and SMART data information. Interested OEMs and NVMe drive manufacturers should contact their AMI sales representative for more information.

https://ami.com/en/news/press-releases/american-megatrends-provides-service-for-developing-nvme-uefi-option-roms-for-uefi-bios-firmware/
http://ami.com/products/bios-uefi-firmware/aptio-v/

AMI supports AMD Threadripper

AMI has a few press releases about AMD Rhyzen support:

https://ami.com/en/tech-blog/amd-ryzen–aptiov/

https://ami.com/en/news/press-releases/american-megatrends-aptio-v-uefi-firmware-supports-amd-ryzen-threadripper-highperformance-gaming-processor-product-line/

AMI: Be Proactive About Firmware Security!

Last month Priscilla Choi posted an article on the AMI on firmware for security managers, with a checklist including:

* Be proactive and emphasize security
* Pay attention to your firmware
* Stay up-to-date with the latest BIOS/UEFI firmware updates
* Have an authorization/authentication process
* Report and troubleshoot issues ASAP

https://ami.com/en/tech-blog/be-proactive-about-firmware-security/

 

Pinczakko’s AMIBIOS Utils moves to Github

There’s a blog post about this, as well:

http://bioshacking.blogspot.sg/2017/07/migrating-amibios-1b-module-utilities.html

The utilities produced by the source code ONLY work with AMIBIOS8 (legacy BIOS) 1B module. You can obtain the 1B module from AMIBIOS8 BIOS binary by using AMI Module Management Tool (MMTool) utility (https://ami.com/en/products/bios-uefi-tools-and-utilities/bios-uefi-utilities/).

https://github.com/pinczakko/AMIBIOS8_1B_Utils

AMI Tech Blog gets active

For the last few days, the AMI blog — and Twitter account — has been getting regular updates.

 

AMI adds RNDIS Network Driver Support in Aptio V

American Megatrends Inc. (AMI), a global leader in BIOS and UEFI firmware, server and remote management tools, data storage products and unique solutions based on the Linux® and Android™ operating systems is proud to announce Remote NDIS (RNDIS) network driver support for Aptio V UEFI Firmware. The Remote Network Driver Interface Specification (RNDIS) is a Microsoft® specification that allows for remote communication between a host server and RNDIS network device connected using a USB cable. RNDIS messages are sent via the host server to the RNDIS device and the host server can provide support for multiple networking devices connected to a USB bus. The support for RNDIS devices in Aptio V is convenient for hardware vendors because with the standardized interface of RNDIS, the need to develop drivers to support USB LAN adapters conforming to RNDIS specification is eliminated. OEMs including the RNDIS network driver in the BIOS allow end users to plug and play with RNDIS supported USB LAN adapters. Aptio V RNDIS network driver also allows the BIOS to communicate with the Baseboard Management Controller (BMC) that supports the RNDIS specification, commonly referred to as LAN over USB.[…]

https://ami.com/en/news/press-releases/?PressReleaseID=389

 

 

AMI and Gigabyte UEFI vulnerability

I wish more user-mode security researchers would study how OEM/IBV/OSV implementations of UEFI firmware update, from the OS-present appplication, looking for problems. For example: https://firmwaresecurity.com/2016/06/05/asus-liveupdate-of-uefi-sent-authenticated/

UEFI Plugfest slides uploaded

https://uefi.blogspot.com/2017/03/uefi-plugfest-2017-in-nanjing.html

Tim Lewis of Insyde has a blog post with an update for the UEFI plugfest. *Multiple* presentations on security!!

 State of UEFI – Mark Doran (Intel)
 Keynote: China Information Technology Ecosystem – Guangnan Ni (Chinese Academy of Engineering).
 The Role of UEFI Technologies Play in ARM Platform Architecture – Dong Wei (ARM)
 ARM Server’s Firmware Security – Zhixiong (Jonathan) Zhang, Cavium
 SMM Protection in EDK II – Jiewen Yao (Intel)
 Server RAS and UEFI CPER – Mao Lucia and Spike Yuan (Intel)
 A More Secure and Better User Experience for OS-based Firmware Update – David Liu (Phoenix)
 UEFI and IoT: Best Practices in Developing IoT Firmware Solutions – Hawk Chen (Byosoft)
 Establishing and Protecting a Chain of Trust with UEFI – David Chen (Insyde)
 Implementation of Hypervisor in UEFI Firmware – Kangkang Shen (Huawei)
 Lessons Learned from Implementing a Wi-Fi and BT Stack – Tony Lo (AMI)
  UEFI Development Anti-Patterns – Chris Stewart (HP)

http://www.uefi.org/learning_center/presentationsandvideos

AMI announces TCG Pyrite support

AMI has announced support for Pyrite Password Protected Drives.
[…]The Trusted Computing Group (TCG) releases a specification called the “Opal SED Specification” that governs hard drive protection and encryption standards. AMI previously announced support for Opal and Opalite and now AMI has added password support for Pyrite. With the support for Pyrite, AMI enables drives that have a hardware mechanism to protect access without the need to carry out encryption of user data. AMI has worked with several industry partners to develop and validate the support for Pyrite. By introducing this support, OEMs can create solutions at lower costs than Opal or Opalite while maintaining the security of the data.[…]

Full PR:
https://ami.com/news/press-releases/?PressReleaseID=381

See-also:
https://firmwaresecurity.com/2015/08/14/tcg-and-nvme-release-opal-for-seds/
https://trustedcomputinggroup.org/tcg-storage-security-subsystem-class-pyrite/
https://trustedcomputinggroup.org/tcg-storage-opal-nvme/
https://trustedcomputinggroup.org/tag/pyrite/

Lenovo: AMI BIOS SMM vulnerability

Lenovo Security Advisory: LEN-4710
Potential Impact:  Execution of code in SMM by an attacker with administrative access
Severity: Medium
Scope of impact: Industry-wide

Summary Description: System Management Mode (SMM) is the most privileged execution mode of the x86 processor. Software System Management Interrupt (SWSMI) handlers are used by software to call on BIOS functions that reside within the SMM. A vulnerability has been identified in one of the SWSMI handlers in the BIOS code from American Megatrends Inc. (AMI) used on some Lenovo systems. This could allow a malicious attacker with administrative access to execute code in the SMM and bypass some BIOS security mechanisms and install software with bootkit functionality. Mitigation Strategy for Customers (what you should do to protect yourself): Update your BIOS level to the latest version by following the instructions in the readme file. This issue only affects Lenovo products with BIOS firmware from AMI. Brands not listed, such as ThinkPad, do not use AMI firmware and are not affected by this vulnerability. Lenovo thanks Bruno Pujos of Sogeti ESEC R&D for reporting this issue.[…]

More info:

http://esec-lab.sogeti.com/posts/2016/05/30/smm-unchecked-pointer-vulnerability.html

https://support.lenovo.com/us/en/product_security/len_4710

AMI announces UEFI 2.6 and ACPI 6.1 support

AMI announced that their UEFI implementation, Aptio V, supports UEFI 2.6 and ACPI 6.1

American Megatrends Announces Aptio V Compliance with UEFI 2.6 and ACPI v6.1

AMI is proud to announce Aptio® V support and compliance for UEFI 2.6 and ACPI v6.1 specifications. As a leader in the BIOS/UEFI firmware industry and board member in the UEFI community, AMI keeps up with the latest upgrades and specifications to better serve its customers in the technology industry. Aptio® V, AMI’s flagship UEFI firmware, is developed according to UEFI specifications and the added support for UEFI 2.6 and ACPI v6.1 gives manufacturers the ability to enhance select platforms based on the latest UEFI specifications. The newest specifications, announced this past March, keeps up with the increasing expectations of the market, providing OEMs and ODMs greater manageability across various user systems and creating more expansive support for newer platforms and designs. By integrating and expanding support for UEFI 2.6 and ACPI v6.1 on its core UEFI firmware, Aptio V, AMI standardizes operating systems booting and optimizes pre-boot applications for its customers.

Full PR:

https://ami.com/news/press-releases/?PressReleaseID=373

 

AMI providing Redfish-enabled firmware for Intel and Aspeed models

AMI is now offering firmware for both BIOS and BMC on Intel customer reference boards (CRB) for the Intel Xeon® processor D-1500 product family and the 4th generation baseboard management controller (BMC) from Aspeed, the Aspeed AST2300 BMC. AMI has developed generic Redfish BIOS and BMC firmware support and has tested on the next generation AMD silicon. AMI’s BIOS and BMC firmware are highly integrated, allowing data center administrators to simultaneously, remotely and securely manage a number of server platforms out-of-box. Other features include BIOS-level firmware configuration and firmware updating. BMC functionality is based on the open industry standard specification and schema from DMTF’s Redfish™ API with the goal of creating seamless integration into existing tool chains.

http://ami.com/products/bios-uefi-firmware/aptio-v/
https://ami.com/news/press-releases/?PressReleaseID=368

Dmytro takes on the Intel NUC

Dmytro Oleksiuk has a new blog post with UEFI security issues with an Intel NUC using AMI Aptio UEFI BIOS.

(Sad to see that Intel appears to not appear to run CHIPSEC as part of release management QA their own NUCs.)

Exploiting AMI Aptio firmware on example of Intel NUC
[…] Today I’m sharing with you the story of my next x86 machine hacking — we’re going to talk about UEFI vulnerabilities, exploit mitigation features of System Management Mode and new exploit called Aptiocalypsis. Also, this time I did responsible disclosure to Intel and AMI, so, at the moment of this publication you already can patch some of vulnerable products.

Lots of interesting things happened since release of ThinkPwn exploit. Firstly I supposed that vulnerable code was written by Lenovo or its Independent BIOS Vendor (IBV), but later it turned out that they’ve taken this totally mad driver from Intel reference code. This exact code is not available in public, but open source firmware of some Intel boards has it too. For example, SmmRuntimeManagementCallback() function from Intel Quark BSP it’s exactly the same vulnerable code that I’ve found in firmware of my T450s. It’s also interesting that vulnerable code is quite old (it comes from EFI 1.x era) but nevertheless, it was never present in EDK2 source from public repository — its version of QuarkSocPkg was heavily modified in comparison with vulnerable one. The horrible and vulnerable by design piece of code was removed by Intel somewhere in the middle of 2014, but it seems that there were no security advisories regarding this issue. Due to this IBVs had no chance to fix this vulnerability in their relatively old code base and the bug appeared in modern computers from Lenovo, Intel, GIGABYTE, Dell, HP, Fujitsu and other OEM’s (oops!).

Well, I guess at this point it’s much or less clear that currently there’s nothing to do with ThinkPad anymore, it was pwned with 0day, it has too awkward code base that follows ancient version of EFI specification and 8 series chipset that is not the freshest stuff you can get. As my next target for firmware security adventures I’ve decided to take some Skylake based machine of well-known vendor who might have a decent firmware that would be interesting to break. Because I like all kinds of small x86 compatible computers, I’ve put my eye on the latest generation of Intel NUC. It also looks interesting because platform vendor knows his hardware better than anyone else, so, from firmware security perspective, Intel NUC is definitely not the worst choice.[…]

http://blog.cr4.sh/2016/10/exploiting-ami-aptio-firmware.html

 

AMI_SMI_Dump

New tool: ami_smi_dump.py:
Extract SW SMI handlers information from SMRAM dump of Skylake based AMI Aptio V firmware.

Hmm, WordPress renders Github gist pages to be unviewable. Remove the SPACE character after the TLD in the below URL to make it work. Or click on the links in the Twitter links.

https://gist.github.com  /Cr4sh/db43cc6687e737d982d3d1c56472c6b9

AMI and Realtek extend DMTF DASH to use WiFi

DMTF SMASH and DASH are pre-os technologies, somewhat like IPMI and Redfish. SMASH is for servers, DASH is for desktops. AMI and Realtek have DASH working over WiFi now. The new risk brought with this feature is that, if attacker can find exploit in WiFi DASH implementation, they can attack system remotely. Before, they needed an Ethernet connection, now they can use WiFi. IPMI and Redfish have similar risks. I wonder if servers are also available via WiFi with SMASH? Excerpt from press release:

American Megatrends Inc. (AMI), in collaboration with Realtek Semiconductor, an AMI Technology Partner, is pleased to introduce RealManage™ 2.0, a WiFi DASH solution integrated with the RTL8111FP-CG NIC controller chip from Realtek.

DASH (Desktop and mobile Architecture for System Hardware) is a client management standard released by the DMTF (Distributed Management Task Force) and is a web services-based standard for secure out-of-band and remote management of desktops and mobile systems. Realtek has long been an Ethernet NIC market leader and with the RTL8111FP-based next-generation DASH remote management solution called RealManage 2.0, Realtek aims to keep its market position and remain a force for technology innovation.

“With the rising popularity of the GUI BIOS, enterprise customers required out-of-band KVM (Keyboard, Video, and Mouse) functions beyond the standard ‘Text Console Redirection’ feature. Realtek’s RealManage 2.0 is our answer; a powerful DASH solution that supports Wi-Fi and Ethernet DASH, and is compliant with a GUI BIOS,” said Realtek’s Vice President and Spokesman, Yee-Wei Huang. “It brings a whole new application methodology and experience to commercial customers, providing a wealth of data and tools for remote out-of-band client management tasks.”

Full press release:
https://ami.com/news/press-releases/?PressReleaseID=359
http://www.realtek.com/press/newsViewOne.aspx?Langid=1&PNid=0&PFid=1&Level=1&NewsID=425

Sogeti ESEC: SMM unchecked pointer vulnerability

[Update: SMM driver dev advice for this from issue is here:

]

 

Bruno of Sogeti ESEC Lab has published an interesting paper with an SMM exploit, well-written with lots of background on UEFI and SMM exploits, lots of images/figures and links, definately worth reading:

SMM unchecked pointer vulnerability
Mon 30 May 2016 by Bruno

This article explains the exploitation of an SMM unchecked pointer vulnerability present in several firmwares. As this vulnerability is a memory corruption, it only applies to firmwares including the unpatched vulnerable DXE driver. It first explains the SMM mode and some of its mechanisms, then the reversing of the UEFI driver in which the vulnerability is present, then the exploitation of the vulnerability in it-self and finally a little conclusion about the impact of the vulnerability. […]

This vulnerability was initially found on two different firmwares of different OEM, both of them seem to have a lot in common. Their firmware were based on one version of the EDK implementation by Intel with several new features added. After some research it appears that both were using code provided by American Megatrends Inc. (AMI) . We contacted AMI and the OEM and got quick responses from them. We would like to thank them for working with us, especially Lenovo for coordinating with us. […]

This vulnerability allows to gain code execution in SMM. In the case of both studied firmwares the flash was not protected by the Protected Range (PR) registers, code execution in SMM allows rewriting the flash and potentially the setup of a persistent bootkit.

On January 2016 VirusTotal (VT) began to provide information on firmware images as described in their blog post . We used this for finding firmware which includes the SMIFlash driver. In total we found approximately 900 different firmwares (type:rom) which contains it, 468 of those had different versions, however it is likely that a lot of these firmwares are just different versions of one another. We have gathered the Vendor identification provided by VT for each of those firmware and got approximately 10 different constructors however 84% of the firmwares have AMI as vendor. […]

http://esec-lab.sogeti.com/posts/2016/05/30/smm-unchecked-pointer-vulnerability.html