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DMTF Releases New PLDM for Redfish Device Enablement Specification

The DMTF has released its new Platform Level Data Model (PLDM) for Redfish® Device Enablement Specification [1] as a Work in Progress, inviting public review and comment. This standard enables a management controller to present Redfish -conformant management of I/O adapters in a server, without the need for code specific to each adapter family/vendor/model. PLDM for Redfish Device Enablement describes the operation and format of request messages (also referred to as commands) and response messages, designed to be delivered using PLDM messaging. Using Redfish, messages are generated by a Redfish client through interactions with a user or a script, and communicated via JSON over HTTP or HTTPS to a management controller. Using the new standard, the management controller will encode the message into a binary format (Binary Encoded JSON, or BEJ) and communicate it using PLDM to an appropriate device for servicing. The device processes the message and returns the response back using PLDM to the management controller, again in binary format. The management controller then decodes the response and constructs a standard Redfish response in JSON over HTTP or HTTPS for delivery back to the client. PLDM for Redfish Device Enablement is developed by the DMTF’s Platform Management Components Intercommunications (PMCI) Working Group [2], which defines standards to address “inside the box” communication and functional interfaces. It can be used in conjunction with other PMCI standards, such as the PLDM Firmware Update Specification, to provide a comprehensive, common architecture for improved communication between management subsystem components. The new WIP release is the latest example of the ongoing hard work and close collaboration between DMTF Working Groups (including PMCI, SMBIOS and SPMF) to seamlessly address both internal- and external-facing interfaces and protocols for system management.

[1] https://www.dmtf.org/sites/default/files/standards/documents/DSP0218_0.8.0a.pdf
[2] https://www.dmtf.org/standards/pmci
https://www.dmtf.org/standards/redfish
http://www.dmtf.org/standards/smbioswg
http://www.dmtf.org/standards/spmf

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Redfish 2017.3 released

Redfish Specification v1.4.0 is released.

 

DMTF’s Redfish Version 2017.3 is now available. Version 2017.3 adds new schemas for BootOption, Assembly, Protocol, and more.

https://www.dmtf.org/sites/default/files/DSP8010_2017.3.zip
http://www.dmtf.org/standards/redfish
http://redfish.dmtf.org/
https://www.dmtf.org/content/redfish-release-january-2018

 

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DMTF Releases Redfish 2017.2

[…]Version 2017.2 of the Redfish Schema and version 1.3.0 of the Redfish Specification are now available for public download. The goal of Redfish is to publish a standard API to meet customer demands for simple and secure management in modern Software Defined Data Center (SDDC) environments, and it was recently announced the standard is being expanded to address Data Center Infrastructure Management (DCIM), as well. The latest release includes updates to the Base Message Registry and more.[…]

http://www.dmtf.org/standards/redfish
http://redfish.dmtf.org/
http://www.dmtf.org/standards/spmf
http://www.dmtf.org/content/dmtf-and-green-grid-address-power-and-cooling
http://www.dmtf.org/sites/default/files/Redfish_2017_Release_2_Overview.pdf

Note to DMTF PR team: please stop inserting “(http://www.dmtf.org/standards/redfish)”  URL after every use of “Redfish”, half a dozen times per paragraph is more than enough.

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DMTF updates Redfish

 

New Redfish Update Adds Composability Support

Continuing its aggressive development timeline, an important update to the DMTF’s Redfish® standard is now available. The newly-released version 2017.1 of the Redfish Schema and version 1.2.0 of the Redfish Specification contain a number of additions, including support for composable infrastructures. With the ultimate goal of addressing all of the components in the data center with a consistent API, Redfish is an open industry standard that helps enable simple, modern and secure management of scalable platform hardware. DMTF continues to expand Redfish to cover customer use cases and technology, and the new Composition Service provides support for binding resources together into logical constructs. For example, disaggregated hardware – which allows for independent components, such as processors, memory, I/O controllers, and drives, to be bound together to create a composed Computer System – becomes a Computer System from an end user perspective in Redfish. Redfish composability allows clients to adjust their hardware configurations in response to their application needs, without having to touch any hardware.

https://www.dmtf.org/sites/default/files/standards/documents/DSP0266_1.2.0.pdf
https://www.dmtf.org/standards/redfish
http://redfish.dmtf.org/
http://www.dmtf.org/standards/spmf

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DMTF updates MCTP SMBus/I2C Transport Binding spec

DMTF Releases Updated MCTP SMBus/I2C Transport Binding Specification
The DMTF’s Platform Management Components Intercommunication (PMCI) Working Group defines standards to address “inside the box” communication and functional interfaces between the components of the platform management subsystem (e.g., management controllers, managed devices, etc.). PMCI’s Management Component Transport Protocol (MCTP) over SMBus/I2C Transport Binding Specification is now available in version 1.1.0 . This specification addresses how MCTP packets are delivered over a physical SMBus or I2C medium using SMBus transactions. It defines how physical addresses are used, how fixed addresses are accommodated, how physical address assignment is accomplished for hot-plug or other devices that require dynamic physical address assignment, and how MCTP support is discovered. In addition, timing specifications for bus and MCTP control operations are included, and a “fairness” protocol is defined for the purpose of avoiding deadlock and starvation/lockout situations among MCTP endpoints. The binding has been designed to be able to share the same bus as devices communicating using earlier SMBus/I2C management protocols, such as Alert Standard Format (ASF) and Intelligent Platform Management (IPMI), and with vendor-specific devices using SMBus/I2C protocols. The specification also allows a given device to incorporate non-MCTP SMBus functions alongside MCTP.

http://www.dmtf.org/sites/default/files/standards/documents/DSP0237_1.1.0.pdf

https://www.dmtf.org/standards/pmci

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