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slides from yesterday’s BSides Seattle presentation (and seeking archive of lost Intel ATR blog on Hacking Team)

Yesterday I gave a presentation at Bsides Seattle on defending firmware. This version of the presentation attemped to address DFIR audience, not just SysAdmin/Site Reliablity Engineer audience.

I got some interesting feedback on IR after this presentation, we’ll do a blog on this in the next few days. As well as a few updates to existing IR standards to showcase where firmware is lacking.

Below is copy of slides:

There are 4 sections, Threats, Tech, Tools, and Guidance. The Tech section is probably weakest to read without having an audio. This talk was result of trying to jam a 4-hour training session into a 1-hour talk, the Tech section lost the most from this compression.

bsidesseattle2018.fisher.defending-firmware

Bsides didn’t record audio/video of their event.

I updated the slides from yesterday, the “DIY Homework” section focused on following along with the analysis in the old Intel ATR blog post on the Wikileaked Hacking Team UEFI malware blob. However, that blog URL is no longer around.

If you know of any online archives of these URLs, please leave a Comment on this blog post, thanks!
http://www.intelsecurity.com/advanced-threat-research/blog.html
http://www.intelsecurity.com/advanced-threat-research/ht_uefi_rootkit.html_7142015.html

This is the best-fit replacement for missing above URL, and it includes some new content (eg, blacklist command) that original blog did not. Save a copy of the blog post, I don’t expect it to be archived:

https://securingtomorrow.mcafee.com/business/chipsec-support-vault-7-disclosure-scanning/

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McAfee releases CHIPSEC 1.3.2

New or Updated Modules:
* Updated X64 Python for UEFI Shell

New or Updated Functionality:
* Updated FREG definitions
* Added mmap support to kernel module and chipsec device

Fixes:
* Fixed memory reads with kernel 4.8+
* Fixed version display in chipsec_util
* Fixed UEFI Shell X64 calling convention for SW SMI generation
* Fixed range check in bios_wp
* Fixed P2SB register accesses
* Fixed IOCTL_WRMMIO for x86_64 in Linux driver

Above relnotes aside, there are some other smaller features not listed above, in the changelog:
https://github.com/chipsec/chipsec/commits/master

I wish the CHIPSEC team signed their binary-only release of CPython 2.7x for UEFI, and/or included their build tree of the EDK2 that generates this, so we can build our own, hopefully ‘reproducably’.

I don’t see any ARM support[1]. Obviously, the title of below blog post was wrong, it was not released at Black Hat, AFAICT. Was this patch lost in Las Vegas? Is the ARM code a non-McAfee patch by Eclypsium that won’t be upstreamed into the GPL’ed CHIPSEC codebase? I wish I knew…

[1] https://firmwaresecurity.com/2017/07/25/chipsec-for-arm-to-be-released-at-black-hat/

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Alex and Yuriy form Eclypsium, Inc.

WOW! I just heard that Alex and Yuriy have left Intel Advanced Threat Research (McAfee) and have started Eclypsium, Inc.

Alex Bazhaniuk is the “Founder and VP of Technology at Eclypsium, Inc.”

Yuriy Bulygin is the “Founder and CEO at Eclypsium, Inc.”

http://www.eclypsium.com/
Twitter: @ABazhaniuk
Twitter: @c7zero/
https://github.com/chipsec/chipsec/blob/master/AUTHORS

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Intel ATR releases UEFI firmware training materials!

Good news: the Intel Advanced Threat Research (ATR) team has release some of their UEFI security training materials!

This repository contains materials for a hands-on training ‘Security of BIOS/UEFI System Firmware from Attacker and Defender Perspectives’. A variety of attacks targeting system firmware have been discussed publicly, drawing attention to the pre-boot and firmware components of the platform such as BIOS and SMM, OS loaders and secure booting. This training will detail and organize objectives, attack vectors, vulnerabilities and exploits against various types of system firmware such as legacy BIOS, SMI handlers and UEFI based firmware, mitigations as well as tools and methods available to analyze security of such firmware components. It will also detail protections available in hardware and in firmware such as Secure Boot implemented by modern operating systems against bootkits. The training includes theoretical material describing a structured approach to system firmware security analysis and mitigations as well as many hands-on exercises to test system firmware for vulnerabilities. After the training you should have basic understanding of platform hardware components and various types of system firmware, security objectives and attacks against system firmware, mitigations available in hardware and firmware. You should be able to apply this knowledge in practice to identify vulnerabilities in BIOS and perform forensic analysis of the firmware.

0 Introduction to Firmware Security
1 BIOS and UEFI Firmware Fundamentals
2 Bootkits and UEFI Secure Boot
3 Hands-On Platform Hardware and Firmware
4 System Firmware Attack Vectors
5 Hands-On EFI Environment
6 Mitigations
7 System Firmware Forensics
N Miscellaneous Materials

https://github.com/advanced-threat-research/firmware-security-training

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CHIPSEC whitelist gets updated

https://github.com/advanced-threat-research/efi-whitelist

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AMI and Gigabyte UEFI vulnerability

I wish more user-mode security researchers would study how OEM/IBV/OSV implementations of UEFI firmware update, from the OS-present appplication, looking for problems. For example: https://firmwaresecurity.com/2016/06/05/asus-liveupdate-of-uefi-sent-authenticated/

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