Qubes: Anti Evil Maid (AEM): improved TPM support

Anti Evil Maid is an implementation of a TPM-based dynamic (Intel TXT) trusted boot for dracut/initramfs-based OSes (Fedora, Qubes, etc.) with a primary goal to prevent Evil Maid attacks. In short, AEM relies on TPM and a feature found in Intel’s vPro CPUs (TXT) to detect tampering of various boot components.

Even if you don’t use Qubes, this is a good read:

[…]To recap — you need to fully trust:
* CPU (Intel, since we’re depending on TXT)
   + sometimes over-optimizes for performance at the cost of security, see eg. Meltdown/Spectre, cache attacks against SGX enclaves, …
* TPM (various vendors)
   + few known attacks sniffing and injecting commands on the LPC bus; differential power analysis; buggy RSA key generation code
   + note that any potential TPM exploits (should) have no means of compromising your system directly — a TPM under attacker’s control can only be used to hide the fact that a compromise has occurred (ie. defeating the whole AEM feature)
* BIOS (a few vendors)
   + it’s full of holes!
* that the attacker cannot get physically inside your laptop without you noticing (see the glitter hint above)
[…]

https://github.com/QubesOS/qubes-antievilmaid/commit/da6c1bacfe5f8864e08efcf7903f9867d40629b3
https://github.com/QubesOS/qubes-antievilmaid
https://blog.invisiblethings.org/2011/09/07/anti-evil-maid.html

 

Joanna Rutkowska to speak in Sweden next month

Joanna Rutkowska is one of the speakers at “Next Generation Threats“, taking place in Stockholm, Sweden in September.

Trust as the no. 1 enemy of security: the client systems study

We are forced to trust a lot of things: the files we receive or websites we visit, that they are not going to exploit bugs in our (trusted) apps, the (trusted) software we use has no backdoors built in or added by 3rd parties. Also that the (trusted) OS components are secure and can protect our data, that the underlying (trusted) firmware and hardware is not subverting security mechanisms implemented by our (trusted) Operating System. The more trust we are forced into, the less secure our digital lives are, of course. Trust is the #1 enemy of security. Is there anything we can do about it? What’s the smallest reasonable amount of trust we need in case of a typical client (desktop) system today? Can trust be distributed?

Bio:
Joanna Rutkowska is a founder of Invisible Things Lab and the Qubes OS project, which she has been leading since its inception in 2010. Prior to that she has been focusing on system-level offensive security research. Together with her team at ITL, she has presented numerous attacks on virtualization systems and Intel security technologies, including the famous series of exploits against the Intel Trusted Execution Technology (TXT), the still-only-one software attack demonstrating Intel VT-d escape, and also supervised her team with the pioneering research on breaking into the Intel vPro BIOS and AMT/MT technology. She is also known for writing Blue Pill, the first hardware virtualization-based rootkit, introducing Evil Maid attack, and for her prior work on kernel-mode malware for Windows and Linux in the first half of the 2000s.

http://techworld.event.idg.se/event/ngt15-sthlm/