Senrio: JTAG explained

Senrio has a nice blog post on JTAG usage on consumer IoT devices:

JTAG Explained (finally!): Why “IoT”, Software Security Engineers, and Manufacturers Should Care: Imagine you are handed this device and asked to get root on it as quickly as possible. No further information is given. Where would you begin?  (If you just want to see the router get rooted, jump down to “Mounting an Attack: Rooting a Home Router” 😉 Our target: A VERY common/popular consumer Access Point. Since you have the device in your hands, you might try directly attacking the hardware. However, if you’ve never done any kind of hardware hacking, getting started can be intimidating. In this post, we are going to talk about the fundamental information you need to know to use JTAG for hacking hardware. We’ll also go over a quick example to illustrate the power of direct hardware access. […]

http://blog.senr.io/blog/jtag-explained

Senrio’s IoT firmware security checklist

Senrio has a blog post with a list of firmware security tips for IoT devices:

http://blog.senr.io/blog/5-tips-for-better-iot-and-firmware-security

5 Tips for Better IoT and Firmware Security

In this new wold of “the Internet of Things” and billions of networked embedded devices,  it is crucial for device manufacturers to bake security into their new designs before they leave the factory. Here are five tips from a team of security researchers who make a living reverse engineering (hacking) into IoT devices on behalf of industry clients.  […]

Senrio+Xipiter 0day for MANY D-Link devices

[…] In our last post we talked about a vulnerability discovered in the D-Link DCS-930L Cloud Camera. Since then the Senrio Research Team has been working closely with the D-Link Security Incident Report Team. Below we disclose technical details of our efforts.  […] What does that mean in terms of exposure to consumers? In a collaboration with Shodan we discovered 400,000 devices publicly accessible that could be affected by this 0day.  […]

http://blog.senr.io/blog/400000-publicly-available-iot-devices-vulnerable-to-single-flaw