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Yuriy and Oleksandr at REcon

Baring the system: New vulnerabilities in SMM of Coreboot and UEFI based systems
By: Yuriy Bulygin, Oleksandr Bazhaniuk

Previously, we discovered a number of vulnerabilities in UEFI based firmware including software vulnerabilities in SMI handlers that could lead to SMM code execution, attacks on hypervisors like Xen, Hyper-V and bypassing modern security protections in Windows 10 such as Virtual Secure Mode with Credential and Device Guard. These issues led to changes in the way OS communicates with SMM on UEFI based systems and new Windows SMM Security Mitigations ACPI Table (WSMT). This research describes an entirely new class of vulnerabilities affecting SMI handlers on systems with Coreboot and UEFI based firmware. These issues are caused by incorrect trust assumptions between the firmware and underlying hardware which makes them applicable to any type of system firmware. We will describe impact and various mitigation techniques. We will also release a module for open source CHIPSEC framework to automatically detect this type of issues on a running system.

https://recon.cx/2017/brussels/talks/baring_the_system.html

https://firmwaresecurity.com/2017/01/05/yuriy-to-speak-at-recon-brussels/

 

 

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Yuriy to speak at REcon Brussels

 

https://recon.cx/2017/brussels/

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CHIPSEC updates

The CHIPSEC team have tweeted about an upcoming 1.2.3 release with more Xen, Hyper-V, IOMMU, EPT support.

Also, Yuriy Bulygin of the Intel CHIPSEC team has posted some videos of their REcon training showing CHIPSEC usage:

https://github.com/chipsec/chipsec
It looks like their last checkin to the public git repo was in April:
https://github.com/chipsec/chipsec/commits/master

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DarkReading article on firmware protection

Yuriy and John of the Intel CHIPSEC team are quoted in a new Dark Reading article on firmware security.

[…] Yuriy Bulygin and John Loucaides, security researchers at Intel Security, point out that hackers attack firmware because they know many security and IT managers aren’t paying attention to it. They say security teams are so overwhelmed by the prevailing threat landscape, that they have their hands full just deploying the basics, like firewalls, intrusion prevention systems and sandboxes. […]

http://www.darkreading.com/iot/5-tips-for-protecting-firmware-from-attacks/d/d-id/1325604

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CHIPSEC training at REcon

The Intel CHIPSEC team doesn’t give training often, so when they do, it is worth mentioning.

Like last year, CHIPSEC will be offering training at REcon!

A variety of attacks targeting system firmware have been discussed publicly, drawing attention to the pre-boot and firmware components of the platform such as BIOS and SMM, OS loaders and secure booting. This training will detail and organize objectives, attack vectors, vulnerabilities and exploits against various types of system firmware such as legacy BIOS, SMI handlers and UEFI based firmware, mitigations as well as tools and methods available to analyze security of such firmware components. It will also detail protections available in hardware and in firmware such as Secure Boot implemented by modern operating systems against bootkits. The training includes theoretical material describing a structured approach to system firmware security analysis and mitigations as well as many hands-on exercises to test system firmware for vulnerabilities. After the training you should have basic understanding of platform hardware components and various types of system firmware, security objectives and attacks against system firmware, mitigations available in hardware and firmware. You should be able to apply this knowledge in practice to identify vulnerabilities in BIOS and perform forensic analysis of the firmware.

https://recon.cx/2016/training/trainingfirmware.html

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BIOS analysis presentation at Analyze 2016

Analyze 2016 takes place in March in San Francisco. It is a “Security community event for malware and exploit analysis research”. Amongst the presentations is one on BIOS analysis by two of the Intel Advanced Threat Research (ATR) team!

Talks:
Tom Bennett – Whose RAT Is It Anyways?
Aaron Shelmire – Sections, Segments, and Functions, oh my! Hashing your way to analytical shortcuts.
Edward Miles – Making sense of ProGuard’s mess
Oleksandr Bazhaniuk/Yuriy Bulygin – Different methods of BIOS analysis: Static, Dynamic and Symbolic execution
Darren Spruell – Malicious Traffic Distribution: Tactics and Response
Rick Wesson – Static Malware Analysis on GPUs
Chip McSweeney – DGA Antivenom: Stopping new configurations before analysis
Jing Xie – Risks of iOS Remote Hot-Patching
Alexander Matrosov – Distributing the reconstruction of IR for large scale malware analysis
http://www.analyze.cc/Waylon Grange – Wherefore by their crypto ye shall know them
Armin Buescher – Sanzoku APT

http://www.analyze.cc/

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CHIPSEC training at TROOPERS

The Intel CHIPSEC team doesn’t get out much to give training to the public often, so this upcoming 2-day of CHIPSEC training at TROOPERS is nice!

Security below the OS with CHIPSEC framework
Oleksandr Bazhaniuk, Yuriy Bulygin

A variety of attacks targeting platform firmware have been discussed publicly, drawing attention to the pre-boot and firmware components of the platform such as BIOS and SMM, UEFI secure boot and OS loaders. This workshop provides a hands-on opportunity to learn how to use an open source CHIPSEC framework https://github.com/chipsec/chipsec to test systems for vulnerabilities in low-level platform firmware components, problems with firmware security protections as well as develop your own modules in CHIPSEC which test for known issues or implement tools identifying new issues. Agenda:

* Introduction to platform hardware and access with CHIPSEC
* Introduction to platform firmware such as BIOS, UEFI firmware, SMI handlers
* Overview of main components of CHIPSEC framework
* Analyzing main firmware components and configuration
* Assessing systems for vulnerabilities in the BIOS and other firmware
* Developing vulnerability testing modules
* Developing fuzzers for firmware interfaces and other security tools
* BIOS forensics with CHIPSEC

https://www.troopers.de/events/troopers16/567_security_below_the_os_with_chipsec_framework/

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