Linux Foundation IT Security Policies: firmware guidance

A  few days ago, the Linux Foundation released new guidance for securing Linux systems. Since the Linux Foundation has mostly remote workers, there are currently 2 documents: one on hardening Linux Workstations, and one for secure group communications, the latter something like a CryptoParty Handbook. Here’s an excerpt of the Hardware/Firmware/Pre-OS section from the Workstation document:

Choosing the right hardware

We do not mandate that our admins use a specific vendor or a specific model, so this section addresses core considerations when choosing a work system.

Checklist

    System supports SecureBoot (CRITICAL)
    System has no firewire, thunderbolt or ExpressCard ports (MODERATE)
    System has a TPM chip (LOW)

Considerations

SecureBoot

Despite its controversial nature, SecureBoot offers prevention against many attacks targeting workstations (Rootkits, “Evil Maid,” etc), without introducing too much extra hassle. It will not stop a truly dedicated attacker, plus there is a pretty high degree of certainty that state security agencies have ways to defeat it (probably by design), but having SecureBoot is better than having nothing at all. Alternatively, you may set up Anti Evil Maid which offers a more wholesome protection against the type of attacks that SecureBoot is supposed to prevent, but it will require more effort to set up and maintain.

Firewire, thunderbolt, and ExpressCard ports

Firewire is a standard that, by design, allows any connecting device full direct memory access to your system (see Wikipedia). Thunderbolt and ExpressCard are guilty of the same, though some later implementations of Thunderbolt attempt to limit the scope of memory access. It is best if the system you are getting has none of these ports, but it is not critical, as they usually can be turned off via UEFI or disabled in the kernel itself.

TPM Chip

Trusted Platform Module (TPM) is a crypto chip bundled with the motherboard separately from the core processor, which can be used for additional platform security (such as to store full-disk encryption keys), but is not normally used for day-to-day workstation operation. At best, this is a nice-to-have, unless you have a specific need to use TPM for your workstation security.

Pre-boot environment

This is a set of recommendations for your workstation before you even start with OS installation.

Checklist

    UEFI boot mode is used (not legacy BIOS) (CRITICAL)
    Password is required to enter UEFI configuration (CRITICAL)
    SecureBoot is enabled (CRITICAL)
    UEFI-level password is required to boot the system (LOW)

Considerations

UEFI and SecureBoot

UEFI, with all its warts, offers a lot of goodies that legacy BIOS doesn’t, such as SecureBoot. Most modern systems come with UEFI mode on by default.

Make sure a strong password is required to enter UEFI configuration mode. Pay attention, as many manufacturers quietly limit the length of the password you are allowed to use, so you may need to choose high-entropy short passwords vs. long passphrases (see below for more on passphrases).

Depending on the Linux distribution you decide to use, you may or may not have to jump through additional hoops in order to import your distribution’s SecureBoot key that would allow you to boot the distro. Many distributions have partnered with Microsoft to sign their released kernels with a key that is already recognized by most system manufacturers, therefore saving you the trouble of having to deal with key importing.

As an extra measure, before someone is allowed to even get to the boot partition and try some badness there, let’s make them enter a password. This password should be different from your UEFI management password, in order to prevent shoulder-surfing. If you shut down and start a lot, you may choose to not bother with this, as you will already have to enter a LUKS passphrase and this will save you a few extra keystrokes.

Full information:

https://github.com/lfit/itpol

https://github.com/lfit/itpol/blob/master/linux-workstation-security.md

http://linuxfoundation.org/

PS: The Linux Foundation also just started a Core Infrastructure Initiative, which has security implications, which I’ve got to find out more on, and will blog on later.

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