Aurora: Providing Trusted System Services for Enclaves On an Untrusted System

Aurora: Providing Trusted System Services for Enclaves On an Untrusted System
Hongliang Liang, Mingyu Li, Qiong Zhang, Yue Yu, Lin Jiang, Yixiu Chen
(Submitted on 10 Feb 2018)

Intel SGX provisions shielded executions for security-sensitive computation, but lacks support for trusted system services (TSS), such as clock, network and filesystem. This makes \textit{enclaves} vulnerable to Iago attacks~\cite{DBLP:conf/asplos/CheckowayS13} in the face of a powerful malicious system. To mitigate this problem, we present Aurora, a novel architecture that provides TSSes via a secure channel between enclaves and devices on top of an untrusted system, and implement two types of TSSes, i.e. clock and end-to-end network. We evaluate our solution by porting SQLite and OpenSSL into Aurora, experimental results show that SQLite benefits from a \textit{microsecond} accuracy trusted clock and OpenSSL gains end-to-end secure network with about 1ms overhead.

https://arxiv.org/abs/1802.03530

Upcoming Intel SGX Features Explained: Improved Virtualization, Configuration Management, and Key Sharing

Upcoming Intel® SGX Features Explained: Improved Virtualization, Configuration Management, and Key Sharing
Jethro Beekman
February 22nd, 2018
In an update to the Intel Software Developer’s Manual (SDM), Intel detailed upcoming changes to the Intel® SGX instruction set. The new features improve Enclave Page Cache management in virtualized environments and allow the addition of additional information to sealing key derivation and attestation reports. The improvements allow for better multi-tenancy with EPC oversubscription and easier configuration and software update management. I will go into detail on each of these in this post.[…]

https://www.fortanix.com/blog/2018/02/upcoming-intel-sgx-features-explained/

EnclaveDB: A Secure Database using SGX

https://www.computer.org/csdl/proceedings/sp/2018/4353/00/index.html

EnclaveDB: A Secure Database using SGX
Christian Priebe , Imperial College London
Kapil Vaswani , Microsoft Research
Manuel Costa , Microsoft Research
We propose EnclaveDB, a database engine that guarantees confidentiality, integrity, and freshness for data and queries. EnclaveDB guarantees these properties even when the database administrator is malicious, when an attacker has compromised the operating system or the hypervisor, and when the database runs in an untrusted host in the cloud. EnclaveDB achieves this by placing sensitive data (tables, indexes and other metadata) in enclaves protected by trusted hardware (such as Intel SGX). EnclaveDB has a small trusted computing base, which includes an in-memory storage and query engine, a transaction manager and pre-compiled stored procedures. A key component of EnclaveDB is an efficient protocol for checking integrity and freshness of the database log. The protocol supports concurrent, asynchronous appends and truncation, and requires minimal synchronization between threads. Our experiments using standard database benchmarks and a performance model that simulates large enclaves show that EnclaveDB achieves strong security with low overhead (up to 40% for TPC-C) compared to an industry strength in-memory database engine.

https://www.computer.org/csdl/proceedings/sp/2018/4353/00/435301a405-abs.html

https://www.microsoft.com/en-us/research/publication/enclavedb-a-secure-database-using-sgx/

https://www.microsoft.com/en-us/research/uploads/prod/2018/02/enclavedb.pdf

DelegaTEE: Brokered Delegation Using Trusted Execution Environments

DelegaTEE: Brokered Delegation Using Trusted Execution Environments

Sinisa Matetic and Moritz Schneider and Andrew Miller and Ari Juels and Srdjan Capkun

We introduce a new concept called brokered delegation. Brokered delegation allows users to flexibly delegate credentials and rights for a range of service providers to other users and third parties. We explore how brokered delegation can be implemented using novel trusted execution environments (TEEs). We introduce a system called DelegaTEE that enables users (Delegatees) to log into different online services using the credentials of other users (Owners). Credentials in DelegaTEE are never revealed to Delegatees and Owners can restrict access to their accounts using a range of rich, contextually dependent delegation policies. DelegaTEE fundamentally shifts existing access control models for centralized online services. It does so by using TEEs to permit access delegation at the user’s discretion. DelegaTEE thus effectively reduces mandatory access control (MAC) in this context to discretionary access control (DAC). The system demonstrates the significant potential for TEEs to create new forms of resource sharing around online services without the direct support from those services. We present a full implementation of DelegaTEE using Intel SGX and demonstrate its use in four real-world applications: email access (SMTP/IMAP), restricted website access using a HTTPS proxy, e-banking/credit card, and a third-party payment system (PayPal).

https://eprint.iacr.org/2018/160

https://eprint.iacr.org/2018/160.pdf

Monotonic Counter in Intel SGX and ME

Some notes on the Monotonic Counter in Intel SGX and ME
Posted on November 10, 2017 by daveti

SGX sealing is vulnerable to rollback attacks as the enclave is not able to tell if the sealed data is the latest or a old copy. To mitigate this attack, monotonic counter (MC) has been introduced in Intel SGX SDK 1.8. This post looks into some implementation details inside Intel SGX SDK.[…]

Some notes on the Monotonic Counter in Intel SGX and ME

Scotch: Combining SGX and SMM to Monitor Cloud Resource Usage

First Online: 12 October 2017
Part of the Lecture Notes in Computer Science book series (LNCS, volume 10453)

The growing reliance on cloud-based services has led to increased focus on cloud security. Cloud providers must deal with concerns from customers about the overall security of their cloud infrastructures. In particular, an increasing number of cloud attacks target resource allocation in cloud environments. For example, vulnerabilities in a hypervisor scheduler can be exploited by attackers to effectively steal CPU time from other benign guests on the same hypervisor. In this paper, we present Scotch, a system for transparent and accurate resource consumption accounting in a hypervisor. By combining x86-based System Management Mode with Intel Software Guard Extensions, we can ensure the integrity of our accounting information, even when the hypervisor has been compromised by an escaped malicious guest. We show that we can account for resources at every task switch and I/O interrupt, giving us richly detailed resource consumption information for each guest running on the hypervisor. We show that using our system incurs small but manageable overhead—roughly 1 μ
s every task switch or I/O interrupt. We further discuss performance improvements that can be made for our proposed system by performing accounting at random intervals. Finally, we discuss the viability of this approach against multiple types of cloud-based resource attacks.

https://link.springer.com/chapter/10.1007/978-3-319-66332-6_18

Signal use of Intel SGX

Signal by Open Whisper Systems is one of the modern ‘secure communication applications’ in use today. They recently blogged about how they use Intel SGX tech to help secure their tech:

[…]Huge thanks to Jeff Griffin for doing the heavy lifting and writing all the enclave code, Henry Corrigan-Gibbs for introducing us to SGX, Raluca Ada Popa for explaining ORAM state of the art to us, and Nolan Leake for systems insight.

https://signal.org/blog/private-contact-discovery/

https://github.com/whispersystems/contactdiscoveryservice

Microsoft Azure introduces confidential computing

[…]With Azure confidential computing, we’re developing a platform that enable developers to take advantage of different TEEs without having to change their code. Initially we support two TEEs, Virtual Secure Mode and Intel SGX. Virtual Secure Mode (VSM) is a software-based TEE that’s implemented by Hyper-V in Windows 10 and Windows Server 2016. Hyper-V prevents administrator code running on the computer or server, as well as local administrators and cloud service administrators from viewing the contents of the VSM enclave or modifying its execution. We’re also offering hardware-based Intel SGX TEE with the first SGX-capable servers in the public cloud. Customers that want their trust model to not include Azure or Microsoft at all can leverage SGX TEEs. We’re working with Intel and other hardware and software partners to develop additional TEEs and will support them as they become available.[…]

https://azure.microsoft.com/en-us/blog/introducing-azure-confidential-computing/

Intel SGX elevation of privilege update

Intel SGX security update for Intel Servers/NUC/ComputeStick. Excerpt of announcement:

Intel ID: INTEL-SA-00076
Product family: Intel Server Systems, NUC, and Compute Stick
Impact of vulnerability: Elevation of Privilege
Severity rating: Critical
Original release: Jul 25, 2017

Intel has released updates that improve the security of Intel® Software Guard Extensions (SGX). The improvement applies to 6th and 7th Generation Intel® Core™ Processor Families, Intel® Xeon® E3-1500M v5 and v6 Processor Families, and Intel® Xeon® E3-1200 v5 and v6 Product Families. This update improves the security of Intel® Software Guard Extensions (SGX) and is strongly recommended. While this firmware update prevents exploitation of the issue on systems running SGX, Intel also provides an SGX Attestation service to allow service providers to know whether clients have the latest security updates. Intel plans to update the SGX Attestation Service response on November 14, 2017. On platforms that have not installed the update, SGX applications using the SGX Attestation Service will begin to receive “out of date” responses from the SGX Attestation Service. Applications using SGX may or may not take action based on this information. If SGX Attestation is used, it may be necessary for applications using SGX to re-provision the platform with an updated SGX platform attestation key after this update is installed. This updated attestation key allows the platform to demonstrate that it is up to date.

Full announcement:

https://security-center.intel.com/advisory.aspx?intelid=INTEL-SA-00076&languageid=en-fr

Baidu releases SGX SDK for Rust

Rust SGX SDK, v0.2.0 Release

This Rust SGX SDK helps developers write Intel SGX enclaves in Rust programming language. We are proud to have our v0.2.0 Rust SGX SDK released. It is now providing more threading functions, thread local storages, exception handling routines and supports unwind mechanism, as well as support of LARGE ENCLAVE MEMORY with the help of Intel SGX v1.9 (31.75 GB enclave memory tested). Please refer to release notes for further details. And we are working on a white paper for technical details about this project.[…]

https://github.com/baidu/rust-sgx-sdk/releases/tag/v0.2.0

APT monitoring & analysis …below Ring 0

Applying Provenance in APT Monitoring and Analysis Practical Challenges for Scalable, Efficient and Trustworthy Distributed Provenance
Jenkinson G, Carata L, Bytheway T, Sohan R, Watson RNM, Anderson J, Kidney B, Strnad A, Thomas A, Neville-Neil G

[…] Below Ring 0 – hardware primitives can potentially support provenance capture in a number of ways. Trusted Computing primitives such as Intel SGX (Software Guard Extensions) can be used provide stronger non-repudiation (even in the presence of a compromised OS). And new hardware primitives could directly support provenance capture, for example providing an append only log for use by the kernel to store provenance records prior to sending over a network.[…]

https://www.usenix.org/conference/tapp17/workshop-program/presentation/jenkinson
https://www.usenix.org/system/files/conference/tapp2017/tapp17_paper_jenkinson.pdf
https://www.researchgate.net/publication/317827922_Applying_Provenance_in_APT_Monitoring_and_Analysis_Practical_Challenges_for_Scalable_Efficient_and_Trustworthy_Distributed_Provenance

Intel-SGX-SSL

The Intel Software Guard Extensions SSL (Intel SGX SSL) cryptographic library is intended to provide cryptographic services for Intel Software Guard Extensions (SGX) enclave applications. The Intel SGX SSL cryptographic library is based on the underlying OpenSSL Open Source project, providing a full-strength general purpose cryptography library. The API exposed by the Intel SGX SSL library is fully compliant with unmodified OpenSSL APIs.

https://github.com/01org/intel-sgx-ssl

 

TaLoS: library that integrates Intel SGX with OpenSSL

TaLoS: Efficient TLS Termination Inside SGX Enclaves for Existing Applications

TaLoS1 is a TLS library that allows existing applications (with an OpenSSL/LibreSSL interface) to securely terminate their TLS connection. For this, TaLoS places security-sensistive code and data of the TLS library inside an Intel SGX enclave, while the rest of the application remains outside. It can then be used as the building block for a wide range of security-critical applications for which the integrity and/or confidentiality of TLS connections must be guaranteed. TaLoS provides good performance by executing enclave transitions asynchronously and leveraging user-level threading inside the enclave. The code is accompanied with a technical report, containing details about the architecture and performance results. In contrast to the SSL add-on for the Intel SGX SDK, TaLoS exposes the OpenSSL/LibreSSL API to untrusted code outside of the enclave. This means that existing applications can use the TaLoS library with no or only minor modifications. The Intel SGX SDK SSL add-on does not expose an outside interface, which means that applications must be modified to use it.[…]

https://github.com/lsds/TaLoS

 

Malware Guard Extension: Using SGX to Conceal Cache Attacks

Malware Guard Extension: Using SGX to Conceal Cache Attacks
Michael Schwarz, Samuel Weiser, Daniel Gruss, Clémentine Maurice, Stefan Mangard
(Submitted on 28 Feb 2017 (v1), last revised 1 Mar 2017 (this version, v2))
In modern computer systems, user processes are isolated from each other by the operating system and the hardware. Additionally, in a cloud scenario it is crucial that the hypervisor isolates tenants from other tenants that are co-located on the same physical machine. However, the hypervisor does not protect tenants against the cloud provider and thus the supplied operating system and hardware. Intel SGX provides a mechanism that addresses this scenario. It aims at protecting user-level software from attacks from other processes, the operating system, and even physical attackers. In this paper, we demonstrate fine-grained software-based side-channel attacks from a malicious SGX enclave targeting co-located enclaves. Our attack is the first malware running on real SGX hardware, abusing SGX protection features to conceal itself. Furthermore, we demonstrate our attack both in a native environment and across multiple Docker containers. We perform a Prime+Probe cache side-channel attack on a co-located SGX enclave running an up-to-date RSA implementation that uses a constant-time multiplication primitive. The attack works although in SGX enclaves there are no timers, no large pages, no physical addresses, and no shared memory. In a semi-synchronous attack, we extract 96% of an RSA private key from a single trace. We extract the full RSA private key in an automated attack from 11 traces within 5 minutes.

https://arxiv.org/abs/1702.08719

Software Grand Exposure: SGX Cache Attacks Are Practical

Software Grand Exposure: SGX Cache Attacks Are Practical
Ferdinand Brasser, Urs Müller, Alexandra Dmitrienko, Kari Kostiainen, Srdjan Capkun, Ahmad-Reza Sadeghi
(Submitted on 24 Feb 2017)
Side-channel information leakage is a known limitation of SGX. Researchers have demonstrated that secret-dependent information can be extracted from enclave execution through page-fault access patterns. Consequently, various recent research efforts are actively seeking countermeasures to SGX side-channel attacks. It is widely assumed that SGX may be vulnerable to other side channels, such as cache access pattern monitoring, as well. However, prior to our work, the practicality and the extent of such information leakage was not studied. In this paper we demonstrate that cache-based attacks are indeed a serious threat to the confidentiality of SGX-protected programs. Our goal was to design an attack that is hard to mitigate using known defenses, and therefore we mount our attack without interrupting enclave execution. This approach has major technical challenges, since the existing cache monitoring techniques experience significant noise if the victim process is not interrupted. We designed and implemented novel attack techniques to reduce this noise by leveraging the capabilities of the privileged adversary. Our attacks are able to recover confidential information from SGX enclaves, which we illustrate in two example cases: extraction of an entire RSA-2048 key during RSA decryption, and detection of specific human genome sequences during genomic indexing. We show that our attacks are more effective than previous cache attacks and harder to mitigate than previous SGX side-channel attacks.

https://arxiv.org/abs/1702.07521

 

Functional Encryption using Intel SGX

 

{\sc{Iron}}: Functional Encryption using Intel SGX
Ben A Fisch, Dhinakaran Vinayagamurthy, Dan Boneh, Sergey Gorbunov
Functional encryption (FE) is an extremely powerful cryptographic mechanism that lets an authorized entity compute on encrypted data, and learn the results in the clear. However, all current cryptographic instantiations for general FE are too impractical to be implemented. We build {\sc{Iron}}, a practical and usable FE system using Intel’s recent Software Guard Extensions (SGX). We show that {\sc{Iron}} can be applied to complex functionalities, and even for simple functions, outperforms the best known cryptographic schemes. We argue security by modeling FE in the context of hardware elements, and prove that {\sc{Iron}} satisfies the security model.

http://eprint.iacr.org/2016/1071

 

more on SCONE

Re: SCONE, mentioned here: https://firmwaresecurity.com/2017/01/07/secure-linux-containers-with-intel-sgx/

 

SCONE: Secure Linux Containers with Intel SGX
Sergei Arnautov, Bohdan Trach, Franz Gregor, Thomas Knauth, Andre Martin, Christian Priebe, Joshua Lind, Divya Muthukumaran, Dan O’Keeffe, Mark L Stillwell, David Goltzsche, Dave Eyers, Rüdiger Kapitza, Peter Pietzuch, Christof Fetzer

In multi-tenant environments, Linux containers managed by Docker or Kubernetes have a lower resource footprint, faster startup times, and higher I/O performance compared to virtual machines (VMs) on hypervisors. Yet their weaker isolation guarantees, enforced through software kernel mechanisms, make it easier for attackers to compromise the confidentiality and integrity of application data within containers. We describe SCONE, a secure container mechanism for Docker that uses the SGX trusted execution support of Intel CPUs to protect container processes from outside attacks. The design of SCONE leads to (i) a small trusted computing base (TCB) and (ii) a low performance overhead: SCONE offers a secure C standard library interface that transparently encrypts/decrypts I/O data; to reduce the performance impact of thread synchronization and system calls within SGX enclaves, SCONE supports user-level threading and asynchronous system calls. Our evaluation shows that it protects unmodified applications with SGX, achieving 0.6✓–1.2✓ of native throughput.[…]

https://www.usenix.org/conference/osdi16/technical-sessions/presentation/arnautov

https://www.usenix.org/system/files/conference/osdi16/osdi16-arnautov.pdf

https://www.usenix.org/sites/default/files/conference/protected-files/osdi16_slides_knauth.pdf

Secure Linux containers with Intel SGX

Diogo Mónica, Security Lead at Docker, posts this:

https://twitter.com/diogomonica/status/817454942369812482
We looked at Haven earlier this year, which demonstrated how Intel’s SGX could be used to shield an application from an untrusted cloud provider. Today’s paper choice, SCONE, looks at how to employ similar ideas in the context of containers.[…] What’s the best way to adapt a container to run within an enclave, accommodating all of the restrictions that come with that? Can it be done in a way that doesn’t break compatibility with existing container platforms (e.g., Docker)? Will the end result pay too high a performance overhead to be usable in practice? […]

SCONE: Secure Linux containers with Intel SGX