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ARM releases Platform Security Architecture

ARM has announced a Platform Security Architecture.

As well, they’ve announced the ARM CryptoIsland family of TrustZone family.

And they’ve announced the ARM CoreSight SDC-600 Secure Debug Channel, which provides a dedicated path to a debugged system for authenticating debug accesses.

https://www.arm.com/news/2017/10/a-common-industry-framework

https://developer.arm.com/products/architecture/platform-security-architecture

https://community.arm.com/processors/b/blog/posts/platform-security-architecture-scalable-security-for-the-iot

https://developer.arm.com/products/system-ip/trustzone-security-ip/cryptoisland-family

https://developer.arm.com/products/system-ip/coresight-debug-and-trace/coresight-components/coresight-sdc-600-secure-debug-channel

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CLKSCREW: breaking TEEs with energy mgmt

CLKSCREW: Exposing the perils of security-oblivious energy management

https://www.usenix.org/conference/usenixsecurity17/technical-sessions/presentation/tang

0x0atang.github.io/files/usenix17_clkscrew_preprint.pdf

https://hacks.hyperspacer.com/app/items/15303894

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vTZ: Virtualizing ARM TrustZone

vTZ: Virtualizing ARM TrustZone
Zhichao Hua, Jinyu Gu, Yubin Xia, Haibo Chen, Binyu Zang, Haibing Guan

ARM TrustZone, a security extension that provides a secure world, a trusted execution environment (TEE), to run security-sensitive code, has been widely adopted in mobile platforms. With the increasing momentum of ARM64 being adopted in server markets like cloud, it is likely to see TrustZone being adopted as a key pillar for cloud security. Unfortunately, TrustZone is not designed to be virtualizable as there is only one TEE provided by the hardware, which prevents it from being securely shared by multiple virtual machines (VMs). This paper conducts a study on variable approaches to virtualizing TrustZone in virtualized environments and then presents vTZ, a solution that securely provides each guest VM with a virtualized guest TEE using existing hardware. vTZ leverages the idea of separating functionality from protection by maintaining a secure co-running VM to serve as a guest TEE, while using the hardware TrustZone to enforce strong isolation among guest TEEs and the untrusted hypervisor. Specifically, vTZ uses a tiny monitor running within the physical TrustZone that securely interposes and virtualizes memory mapping and world switching. vTZ further leverages a few pieces of protected, self-contained code running in a Constrained Isolated Execution Environment (CIEE) to provide secure virtualization and isolation among multiple guest TEEs. We have implemented vTZ on Xen 4.8 on both ARMv7 and ARMv8 development boards. Evaluation using two common TEE-kernels (secure kernel running in TEE) such as seL4 1 and OP-TEE shows that vTZ provides strong security with small performance overhead.

http://ipads.se.sjtu.edu.cn/lib/exe/fetch.php?media=publications:vtz.pdf

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Aleph Security: Secure Boot vuln in Qualcomm OnePlus 2

OnePlus 2 Lack of SBL1 Validation Broken Secure Boot
Aleph Research Advisory
CVE-2017-11105

OnePlus 2 (a 2015 Qualcomm Snapdragon 810 device) successfully boots with a tampered Secondary Bootloader (sbl1) partition although it is digitally-signed, hence it is not validated by its Primary Bootloader (PBL), maybe due to lenient hardware configuration. Attackers capable of tampering with the sbl1 partition can then disable the signature validation of the rest of the bootloader chain and other SBL-validated partitions such as TrustZone and ABOOT.[…]

https://alephsecurity.com/vulns/aleph-2017026
https://alephsecurity.com/2017/05/11/oneplus-ota/
https://oneplus.net/
https://nvd.nist.gov/vuln/detail/CVE-2016-10370
https://cve.mitre.org/cgi-bin/cvename.cgi?name=CVE-2017-8850
https://github.com/OnePlusOSS
https://oneplus.net/2/oxygenos

 

 

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Trust Issues: Exploiting TrustZone TEEs

by Gal Beniamini, Project Zero

Mobile devices are becoming an increasingly privacy-sensitive platform. Nowadays, devices process a wide range of personal and private information of a sensitive nature, such as biometric identifiers, payment data and cryptographic keys. Additionally, modern content protection schemes demand a high degree of confidentiality, requiring stricter guarantees than those offered by the “regular” operating system. In response to these use-cases and more, mobile device manufacturers have opted for the creation of a “Trusted Execution Environment” (TEE), which can be used to safeguard the information processed within it. In the Android ecosystem, two major TEE implementations exist – Qualcomm’s QSEE and Trustonic’s Kinibi (formerly <t-base). Both of these implementations rely on ARM TrustZone security extensions in order to facilitate a small “secure” operating system, within which “Trusted Applications” (TAs) may be executed. In this blog post we’ll explore the security properties of the two major TEEs present on Android devices. We’ll see how, despite their highly sensitive vantage point, these operating systems currently lag behind modern operating systems in terms of security mitigations and practices. Additionally, we’ll discover and exploit a major design issue which affects the security of most devices utilising both platforms. Lastly, we’ll see why the integrity of TEEs is crucial to the overall security of the device, making a case for the need to increase their defences. […]

 

https://googleprojectzero.blogspot.com/2017/07/trust-issues-exploiting-trustzone-tees.html

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